Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Wort Aeration
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-09-2012, 12:34 AM   #1
photolimo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 29
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default Wort Aeration - Actual Measurements for Documented Techniques

It seems that there is a general consensus that having enough dissolved oxygen in your wort for healthy yeast growth is beneficial for a healthy fermentation.

What I find missing is a guideline for different methods and actual ppm results for different times using those methods on a certain plato wort.

So does anybody have any actual numbers that we can compile about aeration techniques?

Common Conclusions about Dissolved Oxygen (DO):

Minimum of 8-10 ppm for most beer styles.
Increased temperatures decrease the solubility of oxygen.
As specific gravity increases, its ability to absorb oxygen decreases
The higher the gravity, the more yeast you need, and thus more oxygen.



Reason: more detail in title
photolimo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 01:17 AM   #2
tagz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 1,549
Liked 154 Times on 118 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

I think the yeast book has some numbers on the ppm for various techniques but I don't have it handy. Basically they argue that nothing outside an oxygen tank offers enough dissolved oxygen for proper yeast health.


tagz is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 01:23 AM   #3
HoppyDaze
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
HoppyDaze's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Wilsonville, OR
Posts: 10,000
Liked 1576 Times on 1175 Posts
Likes Given: 859

Default

Spamtastic
__________________
"Dad, Bob broke your beer!"

*Member: The HBT Sweaty Fat Guys Cigar club

Advice for posting
HoppyDaze is online now
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 01:25 AM   #4
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 6,599
Liked 402 Times on 358 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Don't sweat it. Just aerate as much as you can and you will be OK. 99.9% of us don't have O2 and still produce decent beer and reuse yeast with no issues. Actually, you can give the wort too much O2 with an O2 set up; O2 is toxic to yeast.
Calder is offline
45_70sharps Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 02:01 AM   #5
el_caro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: , Australia
Posts: 606
Liked 33 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Also do not forget that if you are using dry yeast there is no requirement to oxygenate the wort.
el_caro is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 02:20 AM   #6
wickman6
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: vernon hills, il
Posts: 644
Liked 61 Times on 48 Posts
Likes Given: 95

Default

Is there anything wrong with using immersion chiller to aerate the wort?

I've been doing this, by waiting until the wort is cool I then plunge the chiller up and down for a minute or two. It gets a bit frothy, and I believe I'm getting some oxygen into it.
__________________
My wife is like a well crafted beer...bitter, yet sweet enough to balance perfectly!
wickman6 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 03:41 AM   #7
scinerd3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milton, De
Posts: 2,155
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wickman6 View Post
Is there anything wrong with using immersion chiller to aerate the wort?

I've been doing this, by waiting until the wort is cool I then plunge the chiller up and down for a minute or two. It gets a bit frothy, and I believe I'm getting some oxygen into it.
works well. When you do high gravity beers >1.060 you can run into some problems with fermenting to the top range or the yeasts ability....

Also, aeration with actual o2 creates some other tertiary reactions such as increased ester production, faster cell division which can bypass some of the flavors which are released in lag phase of yeast development. It does increase the glycogen stores in the cell wall allowing it to withstand more stress. It also decreases trehalose synthesis which is produced by the yeast in response to stress (osmotic, chemical, temperature etc)
__________________
On Hiatus: Brewing at work....
scinerd3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 05:29 AM   #8
Frogmanx82
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 143
Liked 17 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wickman6 View Post
Is there anything wrong with using immersion chiller to aerate the wort?

I've been doing this, by waiting until the wort is cool I then plunge the chiller up and down for a minute or two. It gets a bit frothy, and I believe I'm getting some oxygen into it.
That's what I do, be sure the temp is under 140F. I wait until 120F before vigorously aerating with the chiller. Then all I do is let the cool wort drop about 3 feet into the fermenter. That aerates it pretty well. I'd never bother with an O2 system.
Frogmanx82 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 05:44 AM   #9
45_70sharps
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Raymond, Washington
Posts: 1,807
Liked 172 Times on 141 Posts
Likes Given: 136

Default

I poured from bucket to bucket, then I got a paint mixer and put it in the old drill to get better oxygen, the I bought an O2 system.

All the methods work. Use the best one you can and run with it.
The better start you give the yeast, the better job it will do without making off flavors.
Even with pouring from bucket to bucket with beer that wasn't super high gravity seemed fine.
I only stepped up to the O2 system because it wasn't a lot of money and it improves things for the yeast. If I didn't have the O2 system I wouldn't feel like the paint mixer limited what I could make.
We're just making beer after all. After you make wort it's like it's eager to become beer. Wild yeast would get to it and make beer out of it even if you just wanted a bucket full of wort.
__________________
Let's see if I keep this updated!

On tap
Black Butte clone

In secondary
Pumpkin ale

In primary
Honey wit

Up next.. Firestone Union Jack clone
45_70sharps is offline
Cathedral Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2012, 09:24 AM   #10
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 2,186
Liked 221 Times on 198 Posts
Likes Given: 59

Default

Thanks for sharing that study. Shaking for 40 seconds, as recommended by Wyeast, has worked great for me. Although the highest gravity beer I have made was about 1.080.

Here is what Wyeast has:

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_oxygenation.cfm


__________________
The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.
WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hot Wort Aeration BoltsFan704 Equipment/Sanitation 2 02-01-2012 04:42 PM
DIY wort aeration jedIPA Other 15 01-21-2012 10:21 PM
O2 aeration of wort IowaHarry All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 10 02-12-2009 12:29 AM
wort aeration Kramman Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 01-22-2008 10:43 PM
Wort Aeration hialtitude General Techniques 3 03-25-2007 04:12 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS