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Old 12-07-2012, 05:48 PM   #11
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Thanks for the help guys. I am going with Candi sugar from the Homebrew shop and I will add it at the beginning of the boil to help said melanoiden. I am going to to probably use 1.5 lbs of sugar instead of the 1. I will go with the fruitier of the yeast, being the WLP500

Think 2 lbs of sugar is overdoing it?

thanks for all of the help guys.


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Old 12-07-2012, 06:23 PM   #12
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This BYO article again recommends adding the syrup towards the end of the boil: http://byo.com/stories/wizard/articl...an-candi-sugar


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Old 12-07-2012, 06:52 PM   #13
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2lbs of sugar won't even be close to overdoing it.

Again though, the "Belgian candi sugar" they sell you at your LHBS is literally just refined sugar (the same crap you buy at the grocery store) but for 10x the price. It's exactly the same. I highly urge you to go with something like turbinado so you can get some nice flavors and still save money. It's also available literally everywhere.
If you want to be super authentic, go with beet sugar. It's most white sugar at supermarkets, an exactly what they use in Belgium. I guarantee none of those Trappist monasteries use candi-sugar, it's a scam.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:54 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JordanThomas View Post
This BYO article again recommends adding the syrup towards the end of the boil: http://byo.com/stories/wizard/articl...an-candi-sugar
I'm sure it's a tomato/tomahhhto kind of thing

Jamil Zainasheff and Gordon Strong both advocate for the beginning of the boil, but beer is beer and it will be good, so go for whatever you really want. Just be sure to adjust your IBU's to compensate for the changed hop utilization.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:24 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BudzAndSudz View Post
Candi sugar is an overpriced joke. Go with turbinado, jaggery, or just plain table sugar. Seriously. And yes, you could go as high as 20% on the sugar to help reach that og and dry out the finish.

Wlp500 is delicious, but I like 530 more for triples. 550 is also good. Really just pick a number, They're all delicious.
The OP mentioned candi syrup not candi sugar. If it is in fact a dark syrup then the flavor you get from D-180 or D-2 is much different than the sugars you mentioned.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:28 PM   #16
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There is a difference between Candi sugar and table sugar. Table sugar is sucrose (glucose+fructose). Candi sugar is derived from sucrose but exists as the separate glucose and fructose sugars (an invert sugar). When yeast metabolize sucrose they must create the enzyme invertase to do so. With Candi sugar this enzyme creation is not necessary or required.

Some say that using candi sugar instead of table sugar produces less stress on the yeast since they don't have to produce an enzyme to hydrolyze it. But how knows......
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:42 PM   #17
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Yup what i donīt understand is this: to make and invert sugar from table sugar you need heat and an acid. When you add table sugar to the boiling wort, you already have the heat and the wort is more acidic than plain water, woulndīt the table sugar invert anyway?
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:00 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beergolf View Post
The OP mentioned candi syrup not candi sugar. If it is in fact a dark syrup then the flavor you get from D-180 or D-2 is much different than the sugars you mentioned.
Well actually no, the OP says candi sugar, but syrup was mentioned later by a different poster. I agree with you though, syrup is a different beast, and in that case I can support the decision.

As far as invert sugar goes, I've read time and time again that the sugar rocks sold at LHBS are a waste of money. Syrups, go for it, sugar, you can find the same for cheaper.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:20 PM   #19
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I plan to use a D2 dark syrup. What exactly did you mean by Just be sure to adjust your IBU's to compensate for the changed hop utilization.
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Old 12-07-2012, 08:44 PM   #20
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Higher gravity wort provides a more difficult environment for alpha acids to isomerize during the boil, and the higher OG masks the perceived IBU's. So if you add sugar at the start of the boil you need to add more hops to concentrate and if you add it at the end, you'll need less of your 60-90 minute bittering hops since your pre-boil gravity will be lower. I'm spotty on the calculations but with some research I'm sure you can find an equation.


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