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Old 12-19-2012, 01:25 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by corwin3083 View Post
I have not gotten the same results from merely leaving it in primary, which I've done for up to about two months total. It just doesn't taste like I want it to until it's been in the bottle and carbonated for at least 4-6 weeks.

Does it start picking up more yeast flavor as it ages carbonated? Should i let it sit for 3 months after carbonation?


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Old 12-19-2012, 01:49 PM   #12
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Tripels often age well.


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Old 12-19-2012, 02:10 PM   #13
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I don't think you're waiting long enough. High gravity belgians reward those who wait. Anthing over 1.060 should have plenty of belgian character using 3787 Westmalle yeast. I pitch at 62, hold at 64 for 2 days, and then ramp up to 70 over the next 6 days for my belgians. And pitch proper amounts of yeast/aerate at pitch. Plenty of belgian character, but it may not show up until 3-6 months in the bottle. The tastes really keep evolving as it sits in the bottle. After 18 months, my first batch is heavenly. Only 6 left however.

Best advice is to get a pipeline going for Belgians. The first year sucks as you have nothing to drink. But then you just need to keep brewing at an equal rate of consumption after that.
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:45 PM   #14
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Sounds like a good plan. I noticed from BLAM it seems like a lot of breweries filter before they carbonate and pitch fresh yeast. If you would filter and not put in fresh yeast would it strip the yeast flavor using a 5 or 1 micron filter. Does any body filter belgians?
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:59 PM   #15
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I haven't read the book, but I should pick it up. I'm wondering why they would do this, unless they are trying to protect a proprietary yeast strain from competitors.

Not very many homebrewers filter yeast. No reason to either, as a lot of it drops out after transferring to secondary. I usually primary for 4 weeks and secondary for 2-3 months. Still enough viable yeast to carbonate.

Reminds me to follow my own advice and get another Belgian into the pipeline this spring. Thinking either a Duvel clone (belgian strong) or a Dark Belgian Strong.
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:04 PM   #16
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I haven't read the book, but I should pick it up. I'm wondering why they would do this, unless they are trying to protect a proprietary yeast strain from competitors.
If I remember correctly, they do this to get a consistent carbonation. They remove the old yeast so they know how much yeast they have before bottling, i.e. virtually none. Then they add their priming solution and a set amount of yeast, and they get consistent results.
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:05 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solbes View Post
I haven't read the book, but I should pick it up. I'm wondering why they would do this, unless they are trying to protect a proprietary yeast strain from competitors.

Not very many homebrewers filter yeast. No reason to either, as a lot of it drops out after transferring to secondary. I usually primary for 4 weeks and secondary for 2-3 months. Still enough viable yeast to carbonate.

Reminds me to follow my own advice and get another Belgian into the pipeline this spring. Thinking either a Duvel clone (belgian strong) or a Dark Belgian Strong.
would filtering strip the yeast flavor?
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:07 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solbes View Post
I haven't read the book, but I should pick it up. I'm wondering why they would do this, unless they are trying to protect a proprietary yeast strain from competitors.

Not very many homebrewers filter yeast. No reason to either, as a lot of it drops out after transferring to secondary. I usually primary for 4 weeks and secondary for 2-3 months. Still enough viable yeast to carbonate.

Reminds me to follow my own advice and get another Belgian into the pipeline this spring. Thinking either a Duvel clone (belgian strong) or a Dark Belgian Strong.
Consistency. You remove an uncertain quantity of yeast in unknown health and replace it with a known quantity of healthy yeast. This creates a more consistent product since it is reproduceable.
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Old 12-19-2012, 03:39 PM   #19
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Consistency. You remove an uncertain quantity of yeast in unknown health and replace it with a known quantity of healthy yeast. This creates a more consistent product since it is reproduceable.
I would assume that the filtering of the old primary yeast does not remove the yeast character. That the yeast character in these beers is not created from the dosing of the yeast at bottling it is created during primary fermentation. Is this a correct statement?
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Old 12-19-2012, 06:54 PM   #20
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most belgian strains don't flocculate very well, so filtering is sometimes done for clarity. the secondary yeast, added for carbonation, is typically a highly flocculant strain like a lager yeast.

result: instead of having lots of belgian yeast in suspension, you have a little lager yeast that sinks to the bottom.


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