Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Hop Growers in Southern California
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-05-2013, 03:33 PM   #11
Hop_Hero
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Fallbrook, ca
Posts: 145
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Put me down for a cascade and chinook! We can meet at a brewery and i'll buy you a beer


__________________
Primary: Belgian Wit
Secondary: Nada
Bottled: Arrogant Butthole, Arrogant Butthole on Oak and Chinook, Rebel Red (West Coast Red)
Next: Barley Wine
Hop_Hero is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 09:52 PM   #12
brewerelated
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Los Angeles County, CA
Posts: 153
Liked 59 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin View Post
I might have to as well...

I planted 3 years ago before really knowing much. Now I have 4 varieties that I don't use much: Magnum, Mt Hood, Nugget and Northern Brewer. Would love to get some better aroma hops going like cascades or centennials.
I am looking to grow hops for the first time this year. I live on the border of Orange and Los Angeles County right along the LA river. Does Mt Hood do well in our area? Of the four varieties that you are growing which ones are doing the best?

I plan on growing Centennial and I will try to propagate extra plants through layering. I would like to trade you rhizomes in the future when I can produce some.



Reason: grammar
brewerelated is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 04:59 AM   #13
OCBrewin
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
OCBrewin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 254
Liked 20 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brewerelated View Post

I am looking to grow hops for the first time this year. I live on the border of Orange and Los Angeles County right along the LA river. Does Mt Hood do well in our area? Of the four varieties that you are growing which ones are doing the best?

I plan on growing Centennial and I will try to propagate extra plants through layering. I would like to trade you rhizomes in the future when I can produce some.
They're all doing well. Magnum and the Nugget seem to be doing the best, but only marginally. I really want to get some aroma varieties in the ground like centennial and cascade. Prob won't take any rhizome cuttings just yet, as they're only 3 yrs old, but for sure next year!
OCBrewin is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 07:27 PM   #14
jperry
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 711
Liked 144 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 609

Default

I live in east county SD, near el cajon, CA. And All of my hop plants, which are Centennial, or Chinook variety, have already started to sprout from the ground and from their pots. I started the Centennial plant, from a rhizome last year (no hop harvest). And the Chinooks, i bought last year, were already formed crowns, purchased at greatlakeshops.com. The chinook crowns gave me a small harvest and then winter came. My question is ARE your plants doing this already? I know its warming up, and thats why they sprouted early, But do I need to cut all these little guys right now, before the roots use up too much energy? Thanks for any help or observations.
jperry is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 08:34 PM   #15
cram
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Poway, CA
Posts: 325
Liked 35 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Mine are not sprouting yet. I find that my Chinook plants almost always follow about a month behind the Cascades. In my yard, the Tettnang come up first, Cascade next, then Centennial and, lastly, Chinook. It could be that your crowns were acclimated to a different climate so they've been hardwired to sense spring a little differently than in Socal--but that's just a wild guess and probably wrong...

If yours are on the sprout already, I'd leave them be for now. They'll probably get whacked by a late frost anyway (there's supposed to be some cold night-time temps in the weeks to come). I wouldn't worry about roots taking up energy--the green growth should be pumping some energy toward the roots, too. I'd probably cut them back and restart either way in early April, trying to get them on the lines toward the start of May. Half the fun, to me, is the experiment. You can treat the plants differently, take notes and build up your knowledge based on what happens as a result.
cram is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 05:53 PM   #16
brewerelated
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Los Angeles County, CA
Posts: 153
Liked 59 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin View Post
They're all doing well. Magnum and the Nugget seem to be doing the best, but only marginally. I really want to get some aroma varieties in the ground like centennial and cascade. Prob won't take any rhizome cuttings just yet, as they're only 3 yrs old, but for sure next year!
Instead of taking rhizome cuttings I intend to propagate them via layering. If I understand correctly you are suppose to keep only 3 to 5 bines each year. The binds that you normally would cut off and discard are the ones that I use to propagate extra rhizomes.

Hopefully, it will work out.
brewerelated is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 06:00 PM   #17
OCBrewin
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
OCBrewin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 254
Liked 20 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brewerelated View Post

Instead of taking rhizome cuttings I intend to propagate them via layering. If I understand correctly you are suppose to keep only 3 to 5 bines each year. The binds that you normally would cut off and discard are the ones that I use to propagate extra rhizomes.

Hopefully, it will work out.
So do you just cut the bines, dip in root hormone and grow normally. I've never done this for hops, but have for other plants and was successful. Will this work for hops? If so I'd be happy to do so in the spring and share them. They already should be acclimated to the SoCal weather.
OCBrewin is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 07:46 PM   #18
jperry
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 711
Liked 144 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 609

Default

taking cuttings works well, I had success and made a bunch of new plants. I did not use hormones, just had them in plain water. after a week or so, in the shade, tiny white roots sprouted and I planted them. they grew bines before winter, then went dormant. but now they have all broken ground again. There are way better techniques then I used to clone, I did it the easy/cheap way.

Reason: misinformation
jperry is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2013, 11:55 PM   #19
cram
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Poway, CA
Posts: 325
Liked 35 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

You can also simply put cut bines into soil and they will sprout roots more often than not--super simple. I often pinch the growth tip off and you'll get two new bines come up from the next node down.

Or you can lay bines over horizontally, not cutting them, cover them with soil leaving the growth tip exposed, and they will sprout roots, too.

They don't have the gusto of rhizomes but it's a good way to spread out the hop yard and get a head start for next season.
cram is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2013, 03:03 AM   #20
brewerelated
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Los Angeles County, CA
Posts: 153
Liked 59 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin View Post
So do you just cut the bines, dip in root hormone and grow normally.
Sorry for taking long to respond. What you are referring to is taking a cutting. Where you cut off binds and root them in either water or soil. You can either dip them in rooting hormone first or skip that step. Using rooting hormones tend to have a higher success rate, but it will cost you more money and is not always necessary. Propagating from cutting is what jperry is describing two posts above mine.

Layering is similar, but instead of cutting the bines and then trying to root them, you actually do it in the reverse order. You take a bind that is still currently attached to the mother plant and you bury part of the bine. The part of the bine that is buried should start rooting and once it starts rooting then you cut the bine away from the mother plant. Pretty much how cram describes in the post directly above mine.

A convenient way to layer is to layer directly into a pot. Rather than burying the bine in the ground. When you bury the bine in a pot you can then transport it after it roots and after you cut it away from the mother plant.

I have read in the forum that you can take a cutting and root it in water or soil, but from what people have described part of the bine begins to wilt or die off. This tends to be true of other plants that I have taken cuttings from such as tomato and basil.

When you take a cutting you are in battle against time. Can you get the cutting to form roots so that it can support itself before the cutting rots and shrivels away. Sometimes you succeed and your cutting grows roots. Sometimes your cutting die before they root and you fail. I have heard it referred to as "Root vs Rot".

When you use layering, the bine is still attached to the mother plant therefore the bine should continue to grow and receive nutrients from the mother plant while you are in the process of trying to get the bine to grow its own roots that are separate from the mother plant.

I have read here on the forums that both cuttings and layering works on hops. I have not done this with hops so I am speaking from what I have read and I am speaking from my experience with other plants.

With a single hop bine I have read that you can use a technique called "serpentine" layering which could allow you to create multiple rooted crowns with rhizomes from a single bine. I will post a diagram of this technique.

If I am successful in doing this then I will have some plants to trade with locals in the SoCal area. This is my first year trying to grow hops so I don't have rhizomes to trade and I don't want to wait a couple of years for my plants to get healthy enough for me to take a rhizome cutting, so I am using this technique out of necessity. I can't wait for rhizomes so start shipping already so I can test this out.


Click image for larger version

Name:	Diagram_3.jpg
Views:	465
Size:	19.0 KB
ID:	100553  

Reason: additional info
brewerelated is offline
jperry Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hello from Southern California bdsmchs Introductions 1 11-01-2010 04:38 PM
Hey! From Southern California! dcBrews Introductions 5 06-15-2010 04:01 PM
Greetings from Southern California sfla Introductions 5 12-08-2009 01:31 AM
Greetings from Southern California findthefish Introductions 2 02-27-2008 05:57 PM
Hello from Southern California Jo3sh Introductions 2 12-03-2007 08:46 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS