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Old 11-29-2012, 06:25 PM   #1
felipefranco
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Hi, everyone

I'm a new brewer from Brazil and I have my first batch of a Dunkelweizen ready to bottle!
I live in the Northeast of Brazil and it's almost summer here, so the temperatures are around the 80's F all day long.
I have fermented it in a freezer with temperature control set to 65F.
The primming temperature should be the same as the fermentation?
What would happen to my beer if I left the bottles at room temperature(there's no temperature control in the house)?
Would it he over carbonated? Ruined?
Is there a problem to leave the bottles layed down(horizontally) during primming?
And after the two weeks I intend to let them sit, can I store them at room temperature of they should remain cooled?

Sorry about my English and thank you all for the help!
Cheers,
Felipe Franco



 
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Old 11-29-2012, 06:29 PM   #2
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Try to prime them around 70 degrees

80 won't be bad but any higher might cause issues.

I would store them standing up.

Hope this helps

Tried to keep it short to help with any language issues



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Old 11-29-2012, 08:04 PM   #3
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Priming is just the act of adding sugar to your bottling bucket before bottling.

The bottles should be kept upright and stored in the mid 70s range for conditioning. They should be left alone for about three weeks for the carbonation process to occur, then refrigerate for 48 hours before enjoying.

Good luck!
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Old 11-29-2012, 09:37 PM   #4
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I fridge them for at least 1 week. That gives time for any chill haze to settle,co2 to get more fully into solution,& compact the yeast trub on the bottom of the bottle.
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:32 PM   #5
felipefranco
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Thank you all for the help.
I guess I'll have to wait 2 more weeks with a full fridge to brew the next batch.
But I still have one question: Can I store them normaly at room temperature after the 2 weeks conditionig?

cheers!

 
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:38 PM   #6
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Sure,I do. They usually need 3-4 weeks conditioning rto peek anyway. You'll find out as time goes by how much time is good for you.
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Old 11-30-2012, 01:47 PM   #7
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I don't see how conditioning at 80 will matter. That's such a short time and small amount of fermentation going on I don't think anything bad will come of it. Just like raised temps after fermentation is mostly complete won't be as detrimental. In the summers here I condition at room temps (70-80). Maybe someone Yooper or Revvy could chime in with the correct answer.

And definitely don't lay the bottles horizontally. All that yeast that accumulates at the bottom will mix with your pour into the glass, which to just about everyone doesn't taste amazing.

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Old 11-30-2012, 02:00 PM   #8
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Temps aren't as critical when the beer is bottled. It's not the same thing as ferment temps. You need 70F or higher to get the beer to carb & condition in a reasonable time frame of 3-4 weeks. Not to mention quality of same.
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Old 11-30-2012, 02:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
Temps aren't as critical when the beer is bottled. It's not the same thing as ferment temps. You need 70F or higher to get the beer to carb & condition in a reasonable time frame of 3-4 weeks. Not to mention quality of same.
I agree, but at the same time there's flexibility for sure. For example I have perfect carbonation after 7 days at 65f. Tastes like hell that early, but its carbonated and needs 3-4 weeks to hit the sweet spot for taste. Carbing at 80 shouldn't provide any issues. Maybe if he hit >100 he would be in trouble, but 80 is reasonable. Carbing would be faster, but then would still need those few weeks to mellow.

Just the thing that there's very little fermentation going on where any sort of product from 10f higher than normal shouldn't create a bad taste that is detectable to the human palate.

I have even heard of people putting them in the warm spots of the house to carb faster.

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Old 11-30-2012, 03:02 PM   #10
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I can't get beers to carb at 60F or so. Even with US-05. I put'em in the MB which is the warmest room in the house. def needed 3 weeks to get good. I've also found that conditioning in average gravity ales takes about a week more than good carbonation to be good.


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