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Old 11-28-2012, 04:18 AM   #1
Deutsch22
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Nov 2012
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I'm about to order my second kit, I see lots of options for different yeast:

1). Dry

2) premium dry yeast

3) wyeast activator

4) white labs vial

What are the major differences and what would everyone recommend and why?


Thanks for any responses!



 
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:55 AM   #2
diS
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I think your major doubt is whether to use dry or liquid yeast.
Generally, liquid yeast provides more strains so you can brew more beer styles, but it comes in less amount than dry yeast, so you'll probably have to propagate it in starter, depending on batch size and OG.


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Old 11-28-2012, 11:48 AM   #3
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What kit and where are you ordering from?

 
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:00 PM   #4
BradleyBrew
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dry yeast is most likely going to be a 6 gram packet of coopers, muntons, or muntons gold. In my opinion I would pass on these yeast. Premium will either be a danstar or fermentis produce. Both are excellent sources of viable dry yeast that have a high enough cell count to directly pitch to your wort. So in my opinion I would pass on the "basic" yeast and upgrade the to premium dry and if you need a very specific yeast opt for the liquid form.

 
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:10 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BradleyBrew View Post
Premium will either be a danstar or fermentis produce. Both are excellent sources of viable dry yeast that have a high enough cell count to directly pitch to your wort. So in my opinion I would pass on the "basic" yeast and upgrade the to premium dry and if you need a very specific yeast opt for the liquid form.
+1. Unless you are brewing a style whose flavor profile is yeast-dependent and requires a strain only available in liquid, I'd go with dry simply for its ease of use- for your second brew, there are other parts of your process you need to focus on without worrying about making starters, etc.

That being said, unless you're making a really high gravity beer, you can get away with using liquid without a starter. It might not be ideal, but it will still make good beer.

Let us know when you pick a style to brew and we can give more specific recommendations. Happy brewing!
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:50 PM   #6
Kaz
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Agree, go with the premium dry (assuming it is Danstar or Fermentis) Being only your second batch, you're probably not ready to deal with a starter and you can make a lot great beers with the selection of dry yeasts out there. Be sure to properly re-hydrate it and enjoy the brew. There are some styles that really benefit from the liquid strains available, but more and more dry strains seem to be popping up.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:01 PM   #7
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I think it's been all summed up. Liquid = more styles but you usually make a starter, Dry less styles but yet still very good, viable and you only "need" to rehydrate.

I put need in quotations because there is a big debate still on the question of rehydrating or not dry yeast. Some say you must, others say you don't.

I always rehydrate but I do so only when I know my wort is at pitching temperature.

 
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:08 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaz View Post
Being only your second batch, you're probably not ready to deal with a starter .
I don't like this! Starters are retarded easy. Starters the way they are done by many HBT members are hard.

To make a starter you pitch your yeast into a mason jar 3/4 full of unboiled wort. Shake it every 10 minutes or so while you boil and cool. Your yeast has probably doubled in numbers and is ready to attack your wort and make it into beer.

If you do the super compliucated stir plate/flask/voodoo route that some do you'll make a great starter. I'll even agree it's a better starter than without. But you can make a fine starter without any of that equipment.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:20 PM   #9
Kaz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post
I don't like this! Starters are retarded easy. Starters the way they are done by many HBT members are hard.
Starters are easy, but I think for a second batch, one is better off sticking to the simpler dry yeast and focusing on perfecting their process, sanitation, equipment usage etc. I make starters with a stir plate and they are just as easy as making them in a mason jar with the exception that I getter better growth in the same amount of time.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:25 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halbrust View Post
I don't like this! Starters are retarded easy. Starters the way they are done by many HBT members are hard.

To make a starter you pitch your yeast into a mason jar 3/4 full of unboiled wort. Shake it every 10 minutes or so while you boil and cool. Your yeast has probably doubled in numbers and is ready to attack your wort and make it into beer.

If you do the super compliucated stir plate/flask/voodoo route that some do you'll make a great starter. I'll even agree it's a better starter than without. But you can make a fine starter without any of that equipment.
I think if you are pitching yeast into unboiled wort and then boiling it, you are screwing up royally! Yes, starters are super easy but this advice is just plain wrong! To make a starter add 4 cups water/1 cup DME and boil for 10 min. Cool to 70F-ish transfer into a jar or something and shake it everytime you walk by it. 24 hours later you have a perfect ~1 liter starter. Nothing to it.


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