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Old 12-11-2012, 01:56 AM   #31
LiquidLunch5211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daksin
I'm going to guess that your beer is over carbonated. What is the pressure on your regulator? Over carbonated beer will taste sour or bitter, with a strong "bite" from carbonic acid.

CO2 is CO2 is CO2. It doesn't get "old" or go "bad." It's a chemical compound that doesn't really react with anything to get "bad."
CO2 won't go bad but it will get a very distinct smell to it when it's old. But when I saw old I mean years old.
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:58 AM   #32
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Do u have an aluminum cylinder or steel
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Old 12-12-2012, 11:30 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidLunch5211
Do u have an aluminum cylinder or steel
It's an old steel bottle, looks like one youd see at a welding shop. I'm over it though, doubt I will ever use it for beer again. I tried to rush into Kegging , buy the cheapest stuff to get there quick. Mistake.
Just gonna buy a brand new tank and co2 setup

 
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Old 12-12-2012, 06:06 PM   #34
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If you purchase a new tank, make sure you locate a place that will simply fill it and not exchange it. Most places in my neck of the woods will simply exchange your nice shiny new tank for a repainted/rusty steel one. There are places that will re-fill your tank, but you may have to so some investigating around your area. A couple good places to look are fire extinguisher companies and paintball equipment suppliers.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:55 AM   #35
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Fire extinguisher companies and paintball shops all get their gas from welding supply companies.

 
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Old 12-13-2012, 05:35 PM   #36
KurtB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokingGunn View Post
Fire extinguisher companies and paintball shops all get their gas from welding supply companies.
I am sure many of them probably do. Most likely TX-straggler's LHBS does the same (or maybe from some bulk supplier like Praxair).

At least if he takes his nice new shiny tank to the store to get it filled instead of exchanged he will still have a nice new shiny tank when he walks out of the store (even if it is filled with basicaly the same CO2 out of a rusty repainted steel bottle that he would have gotten with an exchange).

I think the biggest problem TX-straggler had was simply a lack of knowledge on how to properly carbonate kegged beer, not a problem with the CO2 that was in the tank he purchased or even the tank itself. Hopefully he is beyond that lack of knowledge through the information provided in this thread and any other threads that he has read when trying to solve his problem.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:01 AM   #37
LiquidLunch5211
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX-straggler

It's an old steel bottle, looks like one youd see at a welding shop. I'm over it though, doubt I will ever use it for beer again. I tried to rush into Kegging , buy the cheapest stuff to get there quick. Mistake.
Just gonna buy a brand new tank and co2 setup
Old steel cylinders with older co2 will absolutely have a distinct smell. Try aluminum cylinders.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:15 AM   #38
LiquidLunch5211
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I own a fire extinguisher company and we always refill the customers cylinder. I would recommend that you ask for the same service. We roll over about 4 tons of CO2 semiannually. But like I said before I can tell what we call in the shop "old CO2" so I would assume you could taste that in the beer.
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Old 12-14-2012, 03:25 AM   #39
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I got through around 20 replies before I replied. Not my norm, usually read them all.

The CO2 bought at welding shops and such is very, very clean. And the tanks they are put in, if from a reputable shop have to have a DOT inspection before being certified or recertified.

Having said that, steel tanks can corrode under the right conditions.

But I really doubt you have a corroded tank. Probably more likely carbonic acid is what you are tasting.

I've gotten the off flavor before with an aluminum tank that I over carbed the beer with when I first started kegging..

Just my two pennies. Counts for not much.

 
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