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Old 11-29-2012, 12:52 PM   #21
DrunkleJon
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Be careful. I have found that buying fermentation buckets is just as addictive. Makes it easier to keep batches fermenting.

Speaking of which... I think I may need to pick up a couple more when I visit the LHBS after work.

 
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Old 11-29-2012, 02:03 PM   #22
jerrodm
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Sep 2012
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Absolutely--you start to think, "If I just had one more carboy, I could fit in that brew this weekend." Then, when you've got extra carboys hanging around empty, you've got to fill them with something...it's a self-reinforcing cycle.

 
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:12 AM   #23
DrummerBoySeth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfarm View Post
Lol. That's a great idea!

Why is everyone saying to be patient with a stout? Is it somehow different than brewing other beers? I'm a real noob when it comes to brewing, so I'm not trying to be a smart alec or anything, I'm just ignorant to any of the real cause and effect type stuff with beer.
It is not because it is a stout that you need to be patient, it is because you are making BEER. Many of the experienced brewers will tell you that one of the hardest things to do (and one of the BEST things you can do for your beer) is to put it in the fermenter and ignore it for 3 weeks. This gets a little easier when you have a "pipeline" going, and ready-made homebrew to drink, but can be extremely challenging for a new brewer.
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Old 12-04-2012, 02:42 PM   #24
jerrodm
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Sep 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrummerBoySeth View Post
It is not because it is a stout that you need to be patient, it is because you are making BEER. Many of the experienced brewers will tell you that one of the hardest things to do (and one of the BEST things you can do for your beer) is to put it in the fermenter and ignore it for 3 weeks. This gets a little easier when you have a "pipeline" going, and ready-made homebrew to drink, but can be extremely challenging for a new brewer.
Amen brother.

 
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Old 12-05-2012, 01:01 AM   #25
dfarm
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Nov 2012
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Oh. I gotcha.

I was thinking about checking the sg starting Wednesday to rack into a secondary on Sunday, as that would be two weeks in the primary, and there isn't any activity in the airlock (and maybe I want to free up my primary so I can start my Guinness clone lol), but I'm not quite ready to start the next batch, as I don't have a big enough pot, and I want to get a propane burner so I can boil outside, so if it won't hurt anything to leave it in the primary for a while, it can stay until I actually need the bucket.

 
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Old 12-05-2012, 02:36 AM   #26
DrummerBoySeth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfarm View Post
Oh. I gotcha.

I was thinking about checking the sg starting Wednesday to rack into a secondary on Sunday, as that would be two weeks in the primary, and there isn't any activity in the airlock (and maybe I want to free up my primary so I can start my Guinness clone lol), but I'm not quite ready to start the next batch, as I don't have a big enough pot, and I want to get a propane burner so I can boil outside, so if it won't hurt anything to leave it in the primary for a while, it can stay until I actually need the bucket.
Nope, won't hurt a thing. As long as you don't leave the beer in primary for more than a year or so, all will be fine. (even several months has been reported to be OK with no problems at all!) In fact, for the most part, longer primaries are better (within reason) I say leave it in there until you need to make another batch, and all will be well.
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Old 12-27-2012, 03:00 AM   #27
dfarm
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Nov 2012
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Ok, so I think I have an issue. My recipe for this beer says that my og should have been 1.058(I had 1.051) I put it into the secondary after 14 days. The sg when I racked it was 1.024 when the recipe says the gravity should have been 1.011.

I racked it on 12/9 and I checked the sg today and it was 1.023. Should I go ahead and bottle, or is something broken?

Thanks for the help.

 
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Old 12-27-2012, 03:50 AM   #28
DrummerBoySeth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dfarm View Post
Ok, so I think I have an issue. My recipe for this beer says that my og should have been 1.058(I had 1.051) I put it into the secondary after 14 days. The sg when I racked it was 1.024 when the recipe says the gravity should have been 1.011.

I racked it on 12/9 and I checked the sg today and it was 1.023. Should I go ahead and bottle, or is something broken?

Thanks for the help.
1.023 is probably still too high for bottling. It is possible that you racked to secondary before the beer finished fermenting. There may not be enough yeast in the secondary to finish the job. I would try raising the temp on the fermenter to about 72 degrees or so for a few days. a GENTLE swirl of the fermenter to stir the remaining yeast back into suspension may also help the fermentation finish out.

This was an All-Grain batch, correct? It is also possible that your mash temp was higher than ideal. This can cause a higher percentage of unfermentable sugars in the wort, causing a higher FG.

Let us know what your mash temps were, what yeast you are using, and what the fermentation temperature has been and we can offer a better answer as to what may have happened, and what to do next.

I would NOT bottle at 1.023, because I would be afraid of exploding bottles. Wait until we diagnose the high FG and make sure it is fermented as far as possible before attempting to bottle. Bottle-Bombs are NO FUN AT ALL!
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Old 12-27-2012, 06:47 AM   #29
dfarm
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Nov 2012
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I don't recall exactly what my mash temps were, but I remember them being high a few times and having to lower the heat to get them back to where they should have been. The fermenting temp was right around 68f. The yeast was Muntons Ale Dry Yeast.

Thanks again for the help.

 
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:14 AM   #30
iaefebs
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OP was 11-25 I think after a month he should be done.

 
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