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Old 08-23-2007, 04:49 PM   #1
Bobby_M
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Default Age it warm longer

This is a public service announcement for all those who rush their beers into the keg/bottles and then right into the cooler. Stop, or my mom will shoot.

I brewed two batches about 9 months ago that made it into the keggerator probably just under a month after pitching. It had fermented out just fine, cleared up in secondary for a week or so, then right into the kegerator. I found them to be barely drinkable. Too sweet, strange off flavors, etc. They sat in there for months not being poured.

I eventually needed the room in the kegger so they got ripped out and left in my garage over the summer (80-85F ambient). I just took a test of both of them and they're good beers now. This goes to show how important a decent ale-temp conditioning is. If I would have just left then another month before rushing them into the cooler, they wouldn't have been ignored like red-headed step children.


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Old 08-24-2007, 01:43 PM   #2
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I have often wondered about this practice, too.

I know some veteran homebrewers who ferment their beers for 7-10 days, rack to kegs, crash cool, and force carbonate. A few days later they are drinking. It seems to take their beers forever to get good (IMO), and by then much of it is gone. I can't understand why they don't condition their beer. I wonder if it is a generational thing.


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Old 08-24-2007, 01:49 PM   #3
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Everytime I get impatient I'm reminded when I taste a young beer. Put it down! Unless it's wheat, I let it sit at least a month in a secondary.
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Old 08-24-2007, 02:09 PM   #4
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So, once a ale's done fermenting, what's a safe temp range to store it at without getting off flavors? Cause I always thought 85F was a little high.
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Old 08-24-2007, 02:32 PM   #5
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That's a good question. I honestly let it sit in the garage because I was convinced I would be dumping both down the drain when I got around to needing the kegs. Then I have to wonder though, the big concern about high temps are always about fusel alcohol and ester production during primary/active fermentation. Well that stage had been long completed already. I'd say no harm done.. hey, they tasted markedly better than before.
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Old 08-24-2007, 03:41 PM   #6
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I definately agree, I made some beer almost 2 years ago now and thought it was bad was I just left it. I tasted some yesterday and its absolutley fantastic (if a little flat). Really smooth
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Old 08-24-2007, 04:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M
This is a public service announcement for all those who rush their beers into the keg/bottles and then right into the cooler. Stop, or my mom will shoot.

I brewed two batches about 9 months ago that made it into the keggerator probably just under a month after pitching. It had fermented out just fine, cleared up in secondary for a week or so, then right into the kegerator. I found them to be barely drinkable. Too sweet, strange off flavors, etc. They sat in there for months not being poured.

I eventually needed the room in the kegger so they got ripped out and left in my garage over the summer (80-85F ambient). I just took a test of both of them and they're good beers now. This goes to show how important a decent ale-temp conditioning is. If I would have just left then another month before rushing them into the cooler, they wouldn't have been ignored like red-headed step children.
WOW. I've done the same but haven't gone back to try them.
Really looking forward to trying my tow-headed beers.
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Old 09-07-2007, 02:02 PM   #8
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I was one of those impatient people (it's my first brew, 6 weeks is a long time!) and I put my keg in the kegerator too early and it's definitely "green". Is it safe to take the keg out of the kegerator and let it sit warm for a few weeks? Or since I already cooled it, should I keep it in the kegerator?
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Old 09-07-2007, 02:11 PM   #9
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That's exactly what I did. It was cold for 3 months, then it sat in the warm garage for a couple months.. It tasted better. I don't know if there are any viable yeast left after all that time to do anymore conditioning, but my results suggested there was.
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Old 09-07-2007, 02:45 PM   #10
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Okay Bobby.... so are you saying that you should put it in a 5 gal corny and pressurize. Then let it sit in the gararge around 80F for a month then crash cool it and enjoy after a day or so. Or place it in the corny and purge the O2 out, and then let it sit at room temp for a month then crash cool it and enjoy after.

I was wondering about using this technique and didn't know if after fermenting should I bottle it or just put it in one of my cornies. I have everything needed to start kegging now and so far haven't the time to finish. I have been contemplating on just filling some cornies and letting them sit so that I can finish my keggerator. Here in Florida the temps in my garage can hit upper 90's easily. My last bottling batch I had to keep inside (76F for 3-4 weeks) and they turned out great.


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