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Old 11-20-2012, 07:56 AM   #1
akglyd
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Oct 2012
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When can i expect to be able to bottle my beer?
OG 1.062
Safale us-05 Pitched at 24C
Room temp 20C



 
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Old 11-20-2012, 08:24 AM   #2
Ogri
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You can bottle your beer when it reaches its FG. Might be 4 days, might be a week, maybe even a bit longer. It's better to wait until you hit FG, then let the yeast do a bit of a clean up of any off flavours or smells, by-products of the fermentation process, that might be present.

A lot of people here go for at least three weeks in primary, bottle and carbonate/condition at room temp for three weeks, then chuck a bottle or two into the fridge for a minimum of 24 hours before seeing what the batch has turned out like.

Three weeks before bottling is a good figure to aim for but it isn't guaranteed that your beer will be ready in that time. SG checks will tell you.

By the way, you might find that an ambient temp of 20C will be a little high when fermenting with US-05. The brew will produce heat due to the fermentation process and can be considerably higher than the ambient, room, temp which could lead to off flavours and smells. If you can keep the fermenter down around 17 to 18C during the initial vigorous phase of fermentation then let it warm to 20C or so, after the first signs of temp dropping, and keep it there for a week you'll probably get a decent fermentation and good attenuation.

Swamp coolers and brew belts are things you could look into to help with maintaining brewing temps, if you haven't already got something else sorted.



 
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:26 PM   #3
boscobeans
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I have a see through fermenter that has a small interior ledge about 4-5 inches from the bottom. I check the ledge after about two weeks into the fermentation. I give the whole thing a couple of quick twists and the trub falls off the ledge to the bottom. I then check it in a day or so to see if anymore sediment gathers on the ledge. Once the ledge remains clear I figure the beer is done (I still use the hydrometer 3 day rule). At this point the beer is as bright as it is going to get and then I bottle it.

bosco

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:36 PM   #4
kh54s10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boscobeans View Post
I have a see through fermenter that has a small interior ledge about 4-5 inches from the bottom. I check the ledge after about two weeks into the fermentation. I give the whole thing a couple of quick twists and the trub falls off the ledge to the bottom. I then check it in a day or so to see if anymore sediment gathers on the ledge. Once the ledge remains clear I figure the beer is done (I still use the hydrometer 3 day rule). At this point the beer is as bright as it is going to get and then I bottle it.

bosco
I agree with this: "(I still use the hydrometer 3 day rule)"

As to when it is bright, it depends... Some recipes are not meant to be clear. Light ales will clear quickly and malty beers/high gravity beers will take longer.

I go with 3 weeks in primary then check the gravity and most are ready. I got lazy on bottling my last batch and went almost 6 weeks. The sample tasted fantastic.

I intend to brew a Wee Heavy soon and will primary for 2-3 weeks then secondary for 1.5 to 2 months. After bottling I expect at least a month conditioning.

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:37 PM   #5
RIC0
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My general rule of thumb is do nothing for 2 weeks or even 3.

At 2 weeks check the gravity, 3 days later check it again if it's the same your ready to bottle.

Brewing beer and rushing it don't go together.

I pretty much expect a 5-6 week time frame from brew day till drinkin day.

My Imperial coconut stout will take 5 months....
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:04 PM   #6
boscobeans
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RIC0 View Post
My general rule of thumb is do nothing for 2 weeks or even 3.

At 2 weeks check the gravity, 3 days later check it again if it's the same your ready to bottle.

Brewing beer and rushing it don't go together.

I pretty much expect a 5-6 week time frame from brew day till drinkin day.

My Imperial coconut stout will take 5 months....
For sure..

bosco

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:10 PM   #7
cooper
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Yup, and the higher the gravity, the longer it will take. I've found that any beer I make over 1.060 tastes the best after at least 5 or 6 months have passed since brew day.

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:12 PM   #8
DrVertebrae
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boscobeans is correct. Its the hardest thing to do but leaving things alone for a bit longer really pays off. Lower temps also.

As many here will point out, a good two to three weeks in the primary is good. If you want to do a secondary thats fine but I seldom do it either. Some beers might need it if you're adding something like fruit or other flavor enhancers but generally, going to blttles after tow to three weeks in the primary and then letting it condition for 6 or 8 weeks willl yield great results. And with bottles, you can open one up preiodically and see how time changes everything. Its amazing how they change.

Time, time, time. If I could and had the patience, I'd leave everyone for three or four months. I have a cider thats at 8 months and its nothing like it was at even two months. It is excellent now.

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:35 PM   #9
cooper
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That's the reason to get the pipeline going!

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:19 PM   #10
DrVertebrae
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@cooper, you are EXACTLY right!



 
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