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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Indigenous Amber Ale
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Old 11-15-2012, 03:52 PM   #1
igliashon
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Default Indigenous Amber Ale

Promalt experiment #3:

Mash:
2 lbs 8 oz corn grits, lightly toasted
1 lb 12 oz wild rice, medium toasted
4 oz pecans, chopped, roasted, and pressed between paper towels to remove oil
1 tsp gypsum

Boil:
2 lbs organic grade B maple syrup
12 oz molasses
8 oz maltodextrine
1/2 tsp yeast nutrient

Hops:
0.3 oz U.S. Northern Brewer, 60 min
0.7 oz U.S. Northern Brewer, 15 min

Yeast: S-04

OG: 1.066
IBUs: 29.6 (Average)

Mash schedule:
Cereal mash at boiling for 3 hours (I had to leave for class before I could add enzymes). Drop to 120F, add promalt, rest for 45 minutes stirring every 10 minutes or so. Bring up to 142F, add additional amylase, rest for an hour, stirring every 10 minutes or so. I skipped the glucanase rest because my grains were just corn and rice, so not very high in beta-glucans. From the mash I collected about 4 gallons of 1.030 wort, about 60% efficiency. I blame myself for rushing the mash; had I left it another hour, I probably could have achieved 75%.

But it's just as well I didn't, because I goofed in the syrup additions. For some reason I thought I could just measure out 24 fluid ounces of maple syrup (which is the weight I meant to add), but it turns out syrup is denser than water and 24 oz of it weighs about 2 lbs. So I ended up with a higher OG than I intended (was aiming for 1.056), but that's fine, because my last two beers have been pretty low-gravity.

At first, I was not optimistic about this beer, because the mash had a very odd smell--kinda salty, almost cheesy or fishy--before I added the enzymes. I blame the wild rice, which smells kinda marshy and did not smell great after roasting. But I persevered, and the resulting wort was nutty and delicious. I think this will turn out to be a fine beer, especially because it's finally cooling off around here so my fermentation temps will be in a more hospitable range.


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Old 11-15-2012, 09:34 PM   #2
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Looks good--is this a 3 gallon batch?


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Old 11-15-2012, 09:45 PM   #3
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This makes me think it might be interesting to try an Ohlone (NorCal tribe) indigenous beer made out of acorns. I haven't seen anything in the record that the Ohlone had any kind of fermentation technology though.
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Old 11-15-2012, 10:29 PM   #4
mloster
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Looks good. I'm glad you're having success with unmalted grains and promalt. Just wondering how you cereal mashed at boiling for 3 hours without burning the grains. Did you still continuously for 3 hours? That seems somewhat prohibitive. Or do you have a false bottom on your kettle? Also, how's the color on this beer?
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:57 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mloster View Post
Looks good. I'm glad you're having success with unmalted grains and promalt. Just wondering how you cereal mashed at boiling for 3 hours without burning the grains. Did you still continuously for 3 hours? That seems somewhat prohibitive. Or do you have a false bottom on your kettle? Also, how's the color on this beer?
Ha ha, no, I didn't boil the mash the whole time! I just heated it to boiling and then took it off the heat to rest.

The color is a light brown, I think...there's a lot of stuff in suspension right now so it's difficult to judge accurately, but it should end up in amber territory. The post-mash liquor was extremely light, though...even roasted, wild rice seems to add very little color.
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Old 11-16-2012, 03:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChasidicCalvinist View Post
Looks good--is this a 3 gallon batch?
Yep! Mine always will be, until further notice.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:43 PM   #7
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That recipe is crazy, I like it. I wonder if I can modify it and make Chicha instead? Although I would probably use hops (I hate infections); probably 1/2oz of willamette or fuggles. Then maybe double the corn grits, take out the other ingredients...
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:44 PM   #8
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One thing I must say, about brewing with corn: don't try to grind popcorn in a corona mill! Just don't even try. Trust me.

An all-corn beer would be interesting though, especially if some of it was toasted. I think we gluten-free brewers neglect it unfairly, as well as rice.
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Old 11-17-2012, 07:47 AM   #9
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The first beer I tried to make was an all corn beer. I used some crushed maize from the home brew store, and added some polenta into the muslin bag. Maybe because I was fairly new to beer making and possibly chose the wrong hops, it didn't turn out too cracking. I am up for giving it another to though.

Do you think it is possible to sprout popping corn? It looks slightly toasted to me which would suggest no. But wondered if anybody had tried it. I just want to know before I go and spend 4 on a bag of it. Worth a try,
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by igliashon View Post
One thing I must say, about brewing with corn: don't try to grind popcorn in a corona mill! Just don't even try. Trust me.

An all-corn beer would be interesting though, especially if some of it was toasted. I think we gluten-free brewers neglect it unfairly, as well as rice.


I recomend an air popper for popcorn.


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