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Old 11-12-2012, 09:27 PM   #1
maida7
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I currently brew with high pressure propane burners. I have a KAB6 and a SQ14. I'm considering moving to low pressure so I can have a PID controlled direct fired RIMS type set up. How much of a reduction in heat can I expect when moving from high pressure to low pressure?

 
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Old 11-15-2012, 12:55 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maida7 View Post
I currently brew with high pressure propane burners. I have a KAB6 and a SQ14. I'm considering moving to low pressure so I can have a PID controlled direct fired RIMS type set up. How much of a reduction in heat can I expect when moving from high pressure to low pressure?
Well, it depends

the BTU output will be very dependent on the burner design, you don't say if you're keeping with the same burners (and I'm not sure if there is a low pressure option for them or not) But a low pressure burner will have a much larger orifice and as such will deliver a similar amount of gas, although at a much lower velocity. Properly designed there should be no difference.

I'll also comment that low pressure isn't a pre-requisite to burner control. I'm using high pressure (10psi) propane in my direct-fire RIMS and HLT. In fact it's my none controlled boil kettle that is low pressure.

 
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Old 11-15-2012, 01:43 PM   #3
maida7
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I plan on using the banjo style burners. I have a bayou classic KAB6 that I currently use with high pressure. So that's my reference point.

I plan on using propane. I'd like the burner control to have some sort of safety feature so there is less risk of blowing things up if the flame gets blown out and the gas is still flowing. I'm also on a budget so I can't throw crazy money at this project. What's the best bang for the buck in terms of functionality and safety? High pressure? Low pressure? Intermittent pilot light?

 
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Old 11-18-2012, 03:13 AM   #4
kladue
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Low pressure propane is lowest first cost, budget about $95 a burner for honeywell valve, pilot, thermocouple, and conversion valve/orifice. All the parts are off the shelf, moderately easy to assemble correctly, and readily available.
High pressure brings you to the realm of dual solenoid valves, spark ignition module, pilot, budget about $150 - 200+ a burner.

 
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Old 11-18-2012, 03:43 PM   #5
maida7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
Low pressure propane is lowest first cost, budget about $95 a burner for honeywell valve, pilot, thermocouple, and conversion valve/orifice. All the parts are off the shelf, moderately easy to assemble correctly, and readily available.
High pressure brings you to the realm of dual solenoid valves, spark ignition module, pilot, budget about $150 - 200+ a burner.

95.00 per burner sounds a lot better then 150-200. I assume low pressure has enough heat to brew 10-15 gallon batches? I'd like to save some money and go with the low pressure but I don't want to shoot myself in the foot by designing a system that's underpowered and can't get the job done.

95.00 per burner get's a "safe" system with some sort of protection in case the flame is blown out by a gust of wind?

What parts do I need? Is there a thread with this info? Sorry for all the questions. I'm a newb

 
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Old 11-18-2012, 08:03 PM   #6
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Here is a copy of an older post with the info and links for low pressure parts,
Quote:
Here is a list and links for low pressure gas burner control parts and a transformer capable of operating 2 valves at the same time.

The gas control part numbers to look for are:
Honeywell VR8200 valve http://www.pexsupply.com/Honeywell-V...lve-11588000-p
Honeywell Q314 pilot burner http://www.pexsupply.com/Honeywell-Q...rner-4113000-p
Honeywell Q390 Thermocouple http://www.pexsupply.com/Honeywell-Q...uple-1721000-p
75 VA transformer http://www.pexsupply.com/Honeywell-A...5VA-11016000-p
Here is a link to Honeywell that will help with pilot burner install, https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/69-0519.pdf, drill burner casting and tap for #6-32 screws to attach, don't weld it to the casting. Some have placed the pilot between the spokes of the burner facing in, others have placed it on the outside of the burner ring, both locations work, just note suggested mounting elevation. The object is to have the flame clear the casting and pass near the openings in the burner.
This should get you everything but some 1/4" copper tubing for the pilot gas line from valve to pilot

 
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Old 11-18-2012, 11:38 PM   #7
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Kladue,

I wanted to thank you for all the knowledge you've shared on this site. I've pulled the trigger on automating my system and I feel comfortable I know my limits and enough do's and don'ts thanks to you.

Cheers.

 
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:10 PM   #8
maida7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
Here is a copy of an older post with the info and links for low pressure parts,

Here is a link to Honeywell that will help with pilot burner install, https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/69-0519.pdf, drill burner casting and tap for #6-32 screws to attach, don't weld it to the casting. Some have placed the pilot between the spokes of the burner facing in, others have placed it on the outside of the burner ring, both locations work, just note suggested mounting elevation. The object is to have the flame clear the casting and pass near the openings in the burner.
This should get you everything but some 1/4" copper tubing for the pilot gas line from valve to pilot
Wow that is great info. Does this give me any safety features that would turn off the gas if the pilot light is somehow blown out? Is that what the thermocouple is for?

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 05:12 AM   #9
kladue
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The thermocouple provides the electrical current to hold the safety shutoff open while the pilot flame is heating it, no pilot flame, no power to shut off, no gas through the valve. This is the old school safety device that has been around quite a while in gas burning appliances, now there is electronic means to test for flame presence when using electronic ignition.

 
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Old 11-20-2012, 11:25 PM   #10
maida7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kladue View Post
The thermocouple provides the electrical current to hold the safety shutoff open while the pilot flame is heating it, no pilot flame, no power to shut off, no gas through the valve. This is the old school safety device that has been around quite a while in gas burning appliances, now there is electronic means to test for flame presence when using electronic ignition.

Sounds like exactly what I need. I just want to be safe. I don't need anything fancy (expensive). Thanks for all the great info

 
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