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Old 11-10-2012, 04:25 AM   #1
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Default Wort Chilling in Montana

This is how we do it! 12F out right now!


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Old 11-10-2012, 05:51 AM   #2
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My experience with this approach is that it's a pretty slow way to cool wort. Air and snow are great insulators. I guess it's a little faster than no-chill.


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Old 11-10-2012, 06:29 AM   #3
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I agree. Outside, but not in the snow, will be faster, because of the air circulation. Snow is a great isolation. You know Igloos? Here in Québec, they build a Ice Hotel (yhea, hotel made of ice), and you can sleep easily there, no heating, only natural insolation of the ice and snow.
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Old 11-10-2012, 08:10 AM   #4
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Default Chill...

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Originally Posted by Hex23 View Post
My experience with this approach is that it's a pretty slow way to cool wort. Air and snow are great insulators. I guess it's a little faster than no-chill.
You did see that it is/was 12F for the ambient air temp. You want a bit of insulation when it is that cold. A little faster than no chill? Seriously?
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hex23
My experience with this approach is that it's a pretty slow way to cool wort. Air and snow are great insulators. I guess it's a little faster than no-chill.
Yeah, I found that out the hard way. After fifteen minutes and the lid still scorching hot I made a snow bath in the kitchen sink. I think the whole cooling process took over 30mins. I hope I didn't mess up my beer.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:12 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Montanaandy View Post
You did see that it is/was 12F for the ambient air temp. You want a bit of insulation when it is that cold. A little faster than no chill? Seriously?
Yes, when I learned my lesson on this it was 10F outside. It took me 45 minutes to get from 212 to 140 F.

Certainly didn't ruin my beer though. I don't think you have anything to worry about there. I think the whole DMS concern with slow chilling is overstated. There's plenty of no chill brewers on here that seem to get good results.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:13 PM   #7
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The main problem with a long chilling, is the extended time that the wort is exposed to contamination. With a lid on, it should not be a problem. But that said, a lid will extent the chilling time...
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:20 PM   #8
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It works well if you keep the wort churning, the lid off, and keep moving it to melt fresh snow. The pot gets ICE cold and it acts like a plate chiller of sorts. But letting it sit in place after it has melted the snow won't do much.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:30 PM   #9
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I tried this last winter, was painfully slow to reach pitching temp.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:35 PM   #10
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Heh, was going to say if it's that cold out then a standard immersion chiller would have that cooled in probably under ten minutes. When it's that cold out here in NJ over the winter I cool my beer to pitching temp in 8-11 minutes since the ground water is so cold.


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