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Old 11-09-2012, 07:52 PM   #1
highgravitybacon
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Sep 2012
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E. COLI EHEC - USA (37): (MICHIGAN), UNPASTEURIZED CIDER
************************************************** ******
A ProMED-mail post
<http://www.promedmail.org>
ProMED-mail is a program of the
International Society for Infectious Diseases
<http://www.isid.org>

Date: Thu 8 Nov 2012
Source: Up North Live [edited]
<http://www.upnorthlive.com/news/story.aspx?id=822948>


An investigation is underway into a possible link between several _E.
coli_ cases and apple cider in Antrim County. The Health Department of
Northwest Michigan is working with the Michigan Departments of
Agriculture and Rural Development and Community Health to determine
whether multiple local illnesses may be linked to the consumption of
unlabeled, unpasteurized apple cider.

Shiga toxin-producing _E. coli_ (STEC) [also called enterohemorrhagic
_E. coli_ - EHEC] bacteria have been detected in stool samples from
several Antrim County residents who developed severe intestinal
illness and diarrhea during the past 2 weeks. Samples have also been
collected to determine whether these cases may be linked to
unpasteurized apple cider that was produced locally by an unlicensed
facility and without the warning labels required by law for
unpasteurized products.

According to Joshua Meyerson, MD, Medical Director for the Health
Department of Northwest Michigan, apple cider, whether pasteurized or
unpasteurized, should be obtained only from licensed facilities or
vendors.

"Shiga toxin-producing _E. coli_ comes from eating foods contaminated
with traces of human or animal feces," Meyerson explained. "This is
sometimes associated with under-cooked meat, produce, and
unpasteurized cider or dairy goods produced without the necessary
safeguards to prevent contamination."

Meyerson adds that anyone experiencing abdominal pain and worsening or
bloody diarrhea, especially those who may have recently consumed
unpasteurized apple cider from an unknown or unlicensed source, should
contact a physician. "Symptoms usually appear within 3 to 10 days
following exposure," he said. "Young children and the elderly face
greater risk of severe complications."

- --
Communicated by:
ProMED-mail <[email protected]>

[The information suggesting that the unpasteurized apple cider is the
vehicle for the cases of enterohemorrhagic _E. coli_ is not stated,
but this circumstance has been reported in the past. Two events need
to happen for this to occur: 1st, the apples need to be harvested from
the ground (after falling from the tree) from a field contaminated
with animal feces; and 2nd, the cider produced from the contaminated
apples needs to not be pasteurized. - Mod.LL

A HealthMap/ProMED-mail map can be accessed at:
<http://healthmap.org/r/1nDW>.]

 
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Old 11-10-2012, 12:43 AM   #2
roadymi
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Dec 2009
Middle of the Mitten, Michigan
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That's why you buy cider from reputable places that don't use drops.
__________________
Reality is an illusion that occurs due to the lack of alcohol.
Give a man a beer, he'll drink for the day.Teach a man to brew, he'll be drunk the rest of his life.
I have 8 carboys, 8 cornies, 5-1 gal jugs, 200 wine bottles, 10 cases of beer bottles and a nice assortment of flip tops....My goal is to keep them at least 50% occupied

 
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Old 11-10-2012, 01:01 AM   #3
highgravitybacon
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Sep 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadymi View Post
That's why you buy cider from reputable places that don't use drops.
Unless you want that "horsey" "septic" and "GI Bleed" flavor and aroma that goes with an e.coli fermentation.

 
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Old 11-10-2012, 02:35 AM   #4
ThorGodOfThunder
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Oct 2012
Lancaster, PA
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I press my own cider (well, I take my apples to a guy who presses them for me while I jug it) and I refuse to put any apples in the cider that I wouldn't eat as-is. Everyone raves about my cider and how good it is.

But enough bragging.

I saw on The Chew (its often on in the lunchroom at work) that the show's cast suggested using bruised and split apples for cider. That is the worst thing you can do. Crap in, crap out.

A lot of places don't wash the apples really well and you get insects, dirt, and grass in if you are lucky, and bird sh!t if you aren't.

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Old 11-10-2012, 07:44 PM   #5
gregbathurst
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Apr 2009
Australia
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It is very unprofessional of a scientific organisation to say cider when they mean juice, even though I know cider means juice in the USA. very imprecise language bound to cause confusion. E-coli won't survive the fermentation procedure so this article has no relevance to hard cider. If you don't graze animals under your trees it also doesn't have relevance.
Did you know wine grapes are never, ever washed? They get covered with insects and bird****.

 
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Old 11-10-2012, 09:30 PM   #6
hellpatrol
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Sep 2012
central, CT
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"...and that making hard cider will NOT magically sanitize the juice somehow because it has alcohol in it. If your sweet cider is contaminated, your hard cider will be too."

if worried about e coli, bottle pasteurizing should kill anything leftover

 
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Old 11-10-2012, 11:50 PM   #7
gregbathurst
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Apr 2009
Australia
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To my knowledge e.coli poisoning has never happened from hard cider, nor is e.coli a cause of off flavors. You don't need to pasteurise hard cider to make it safe, the notion is ridiculous. What is the attribution for your quote? This is a whole beat-up and folks shouldn't start worrying that their hard cider will poison them (except for the ethanol). Juice is a different matter.

 
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Old 11-11-2012, 03:23 AM   #8
highgravitybacon
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Sep 2012
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My point in posting this wasn't to cause some freak out about e. coli. Don't eat poop, poop covered objects, or eat raw chicken and you're 99% safe. It was simply to point out that there are a lot of unscrupulous places selling crappy ciders.

Classic example of how "natural" does not equal "safe".

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Old 11-11-2012, 04:56 AM   #9
gcastrat
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May 2012
Plainfield, Indiana
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Although I never tried, I bet you could use apples from the ground and quickly press them. Then hit it with Kmeta and I'm pretty sure that'll kill whatever lives in the juice.

 
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Old 11-11-2012, 05:02 AM   #10
highgravitybacon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcastrat View Post
Although I never tried, I bet you could use apples from the ground and quickly press them. Then hit it with Kmeta and I'm pretty sure that'll kill whatever lives in the juice.
The issue isn't your juice. It's the bucket, the press, your hands, the counter top, your clothes, everything you accidentally touched and didn't realize it, the door knob, your shoes. You become a walking disease spreading machine waiting to poison your family.

It survives for months on non porous surfaces.
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/6/130

 
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