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Old 11-09-2012, 03:25 AM   #1
afoster
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I let me beer ferment for a week and then I transfer it into a secondary for about a week. I transfer my beer to my bottling bucket and add my priming sugar for carbonation. After sitting in the bottle for 3 months I end up with lots of sediment or trub at the bottom of my bottles. Is there anyway to prevent this from happening. The beer taste great, I just have to pour it into a glass to keep the trub from mixing with the beer. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks Andy

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:34 AM   #2
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That's Bottle-conditioned homebrew. just leave 1/4 Inch in the bottle when you pour unless you like the taste of yeast.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:38 AM   #3
chungking
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No way to get around this if you condition in bottles...

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 04:12 AM   #4
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Heres a link to a device that captures the yeast cake/trub developed during bottle conditioning. Have not tried these myself, but the theory is sound.

Now, sit back, grab a cold beer, and enjoy watching Craig of Craigtube fame explain how these contraptions work...second thought, it's Craig.......better make that two beers!


http://sedexbrewing.com/

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Old 11-09-2012, 05:20 AM   #5
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Define 'lots.' 1/4"? More?
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:58 AM   #6
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Also once the yeast is in your gut good chance it will make you unpleasant to be around
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Old 11-09-2012, 11:43 AM   #7
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Letting your beer ferment for a week should get you lots of sediment. For your next brew you should try leaving it in the fermenter longer. The beer that I let stay in the fermenter for 9 weeks has such a small amount of sediment that it is hard to see it. I'd suggest you give your next batch 3 weeks in the fermenter and see if you notice the difference in sediment and taste.

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Old 11-09-2012, 12:26 PM   #8
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Your beer may well be finished fermenting after two weeks but it sounds like it needs a little more time clearing up.

My beers (all dark ales with OG's 150-160) stay in the fermenter for about 3 weeks. Usually they are done fermenting in less than one week but untill they clear up and are near bright they don't get near a bottle. I don't mind a little cloud in my beer but I don't like rehashing the life cycle of yeast to everyone that has a beer at my house.

Most of the time the only sediment is from the priming sugar. After a month conditioning it is hard to see and stays firm to the bottle bottom allowing a full 12 ounce pour.

bosco

ps, I do not use a secondary.

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Old 11-09-2012, 02:47 PM   #9
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I typically give my bottles a good 5-7 "swirls" before cracking them open. This seems to eliminate all that gross sediment at the bottom.

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buttcord View Post
I typically give my bottles a good 5-7 "swirls" before cracking them open. This seems to eliminate all that gross sediment at the bottom.
Your putting all the settled yeast back into suspension if you do that. Some people do that on purpose because they like it. Most pour the clear beer into a glass and leave the gunk behind.

 
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