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Old 11-08-2012, 11:56 PM   #21
FuzzeWuzze
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrewski View Post
Sorry I just can't buy into the 8 gallon pot. I do 5 gallon batches in a 9 gallon pot from homebrewing.org and I wish it was bigger. The challenge is getting 5 gallons into a keg, not 4 not 4.5. That means you have to get 5.25 gallons into the fermenter, and accounting for kettle losses and boiloff that means (depending upon your setup) 6 to 6.25 gallon recipes to start with. That means you could easily be at 7.5 gallons to start the boil. I started off with 8 gallons the other day. Fermcap is your friend in preventing boilovers, but extra room in the kettle would be better.

I say go with 10 gallon kettle minimum for 5 gallon batches.
Just dont boil so hard? You just need a nice rolling boil, not Mt Vesuvius blowing up in your pot like some people here do.



 
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Old 11-09-2012, 12:03 AM   #22
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Definitely 10 gallon for boiling 5 gallon batches. I always shoot for 5.5 to 6 gallons after the boil, so I need at least 7 gallons minimum. Wouldn't want to do that in an 8 gallon pot. Besides, if you ever do decide to go to 10 gallon batches, you could switch the pot to your MLT.

Regarding burners, I spent the $$$ and bought the Blichmann with the leg extensions. I have knocked off a good 15-20 minutes off my brew day and I can hear myself think during the boil--the sucker is QUIET.

I have 3 propane tanks...remember, he who dies with the most brew toys wins!!!!


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Old 11-09-2012, 12:15 AM   #23
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I'll have to wait on the AG setup for 10 gallons. Don't quite have a budget for all that metal yet. But I'm hopeful that I can have it soon.

Had my first glass of honey cream ale today. It cost me $280. It was the single most expensive beer I've ever drank. At least the rest of them are free! :0)


EDIT: Just found 2 42 Quart aluminum pots with lids and strainers for $100 + tax locally. So my show is back on the road!

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 02:28 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FuzzeWuzze

Just dont boil so hard? You just need a nice rolling boil, not Mt Vesuvius blowing up in your pot like some people here do.
Depends on your burner and your kettle dimensions, low boil I lose 1 gallon, high boil 1.5 gallons, and that's just for a 60 minute boil. And I don't have a banjo burner.

I am not the only person recommending a 10 gallon kettle in this thread.

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 02:58 AM   #25
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I "ended up" going bigger because 5 gallons isn't as worth it as making 10 gallons in the same amount of time.!!!!! hahaha My pipeline is ahead of me now and if I were only doing 5 gallon batches I would be IN A HURRY to brew every other weekend instead of WANTING TO BREW every other weekend like I am now. I have found personally, and read here also, that all-grain adds about an extra hour to your brew day. Moving to 10 gallons was an easy choice for me.
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:05 AM   #26
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I'm ok with doing 5 gallon partial mashes. My main concern was the cost vs quality. And making sure I chose the right equipment to start with. I'll admit I'm still learning a lot about it so I have a lot of newb questions still.

Thanks for the help on this thread!

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:34 AM   #27
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I'm sure it's no problem at all for everyone here. I'm a relative noob myself, and if I think I can help I try. Those others that no WAY WAY more than me like helping as well.

Still, GOOD LUCK TO YA!
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:45 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoTrubble View Post
From my canning experience, I use vinegar and boils to clean oxidation.
Not quite sure what you're getting at here, but make sure you're not attempting to clean away the oxidation layer on an aluminum kettle you plan to use for brewing beer! Canning is one thing, since the water you're boiling in, ostensibly, doesn't contact any food items. But you're making beer here - you WANT that oxidation layer intact to provide a buffer between the aluminum and your wort.

 
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Old 11-09-2012, 04:17 AM   #29
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Thanks for all the input everyone! Lots of great points were made. I hadn't even thought of the extra water needed for a 90 or 120 minute boil. Sounds like 10 gallon is going to be the best way to go. Now to find one at a price point SWMBO agrees with.
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Old 11-09-2012, 04:43 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MTate37 View Post
Thanks for all the input everyone! Lots of great points were made. I hadn't even thought of the extra water needed for a 90 or 120 minute boil. Sounds like 10 gallon is going to be the best way to go. Now to find one at a price point SWMBO agrees with.
Cheap cooler, a LEGALLY purchased half-barrel keg and a 100,000+ burner is almost all I needed to go 10 gallon all-grain. You'll end up "upgrading" here and there, but it will get you going.

Again, GOOD LUCK!


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