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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Kettles, Mash Tuns, & Hot Liquor Tanks > drilling my keg
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Old 11-07-2012, 11:58 PM   #21
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Are you trying to drill the same place as you tried starting before. You could have work hardened the metal. Maybe try another place. Also everyone says slow but i probably use the drill half to 3/4 speed. Also I drill in spurts of like 2 seconds spray oil 2 seconds spray oil so the bit stays cool. You should see the bit making chips if not press harder . It should only take like 20 or 30 seconds to drill . Also don't buy bits from harbor frieght but any metal bit should be fine


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Old 11-08-2012, 12:15 AM   #22
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I've found that bi-metal hole saws are easier to work with than the step bits. You don't have to worry about creating a dull spot on your bit before you get to your final hole size. As stated above: low RPM and lots of oil.

They cost less too, especially if you already have an arbor.


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Old 11-08-2012, 06:56 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenshead
I've found that bi-metal hole saws are easier to work with than the step bits. You don't have to worry about creating a dull spot on your bit before you get to your final hole size. As stated above: low RPM and lots of oil.

They cost less too, especially if you already have an arbor.
That is exactly what I did even before your post. And or worked like a charm. Only 10 bucks and works fast and effective. Much better than a step bit for 5x red
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Old 11-09-2012, 03:52 PM   #24
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On the to-do list: Make a video showing a Chinese step bit making 10 holes in a piece of scrap stainless without self destructing. I recently drilled a 13/16" hole in a 2" triclover cap and it's still cutting like new (the TC plate is a little thicker than 1/4").
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:11 AM   #25
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Simcoe26, look back at my previous post about drilling speed. Small bits require higher speeds. As your bit size increases, slow your speed. You could start your 1/8" pilot hole at 2000rpm, just use plenty of oil. Once you start with the step bit, slow it down. You should be at about 600rpm to start and then down to 300rpm by the time you hit 1/2". Use that to the end. If you have work hardened your work piece (BK) you can either anneal the metal or start over in a new location. If you have not done any damage, the new location is a better (and easier) option. Also, make sure you punch the location. If you don't put a dimple in the metal, your bit will just wander and you'll never get anywhere, especially with all of that cutting oil on the surface.
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Old 11-10-2012, 04:12 PM   #26
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Thank you everyone for the advice. I got through the keg easily with a hole saw by Lennox. It went through with no problem.

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From top to bottom left to right: sparge tank, boil kettle, and mash run to be set up in a gravity system
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Old 11-10-2012, 05:29 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wegz15 View Post
I've used the harbor freight bits with success. I've used it on 5 kegs with over 15 holes total. I used vegetable oil to cool. Slow rpm and a lot of pressure. Didn't range much time for a whole. Maybe 5 minutes.
I've also done this with the same bit and same oil on two kegs with the same speed.


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