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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > B.C. Pale Ale
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Old 10-24-2012, 09:10 PM   #1
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Default B.C. Pale Ale

I posted the following thread about 9 months ago about pale ales I had last time I went to B.C. Canada. They were an awesomely malty style, almost no detectable hops and it tasted like liquid bread (only way to describe it).

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/cana...e-ales-298492/

Now, I am trying to put together a recipe with the liquid bread flavor that British Columbian style pale ales have. I can't seem to find much information on these other than on beer advocate. However, the beer I remember most (Powerhouse Pale Ale by Begbie Brewery) has this description from the brewery: A generous portion of lightly roasted malt gives this beer a smooth yet distinctive character. That makes me think victory malt. Also in the thread above, Nugent mentioned the use of chocolate malt in those types of ales.

As such, I am thinking of the following recipe (5.5G):
9 lbs American 2-row (maybe Canadian 2-row if my LHBS has some)
1 lb Victory Malt
.5 lbs Crystal 45L
.25 lbs Pale Chocolate Malt

.5oz Nugget @60
.5oz EKG @30

Wyeast British Ale

OG:1.053
FG:1.013
IBU:32-35 (depending on the program used)
SRM:12

Is this going to get me what I am looking for? I was also thinking of reducing the crystal and/or chocolate by half, and/or increasing the victory up to 1.5 lbs, but I don't know exactly what that will get me. I am worried I will end up with something that tastes like fat tire, which is not what I am shooting for.


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Old 10-25-2012, 02:35 AM   #2
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have you tried emailing some breweries? if the technique is a regional style, it's unlikely to be a secret.


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Old 10-25-2012, 03:18 AM   #3
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Full disclosure: This recipe was taken from Dan's Homebrewing in Vancouver's website.

Granville Island Pale Ale is one of the BC malty pale ales. Might help.

Granville Island Pale Ale - O.G. - 1.048

10 lb Pale Malt
8 oz British crystal
4 oz carapils malt
1 oz chocolate malt

8 AAU Northern Brewer 60 minutes
.75 oz Cascade finishing hops

ale yeast

Fairly dark, for a pale ale, malty, a bit sweet, but the hops do come through, especially when consumed with barbequed food.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
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Well I just emailed the brewery, so hopefully I'll get a response soon. However, I was wondering what people thought was giving the beer its bready flavor. Is it the yeast, a specialty grain, or just a high mash temp with a clean yeast?
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Old 10-28-2012, 04:26 PM   #5
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They could be using Vienna or Munich malt for a portion of the base grains. That gives a bready/toasty flavor. Or you might try using a British pale malt like Maris Otter instead of domestic 2-row.
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:37 PM   #6
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I haven't heard from the brewery yet, but I am preparing for a brew day and I am thinking of brewing the following recipe for my first attempt at this style.

Batch size: 5.5G
9 lbs UK Pale Malt
2 lbs Victory Malt
2 oz UK Chocolate Malt

1 oz Challenger @60
.25 oz Glacier @60 (to reach 31 IBUs)
.5 oz Glacier @Flameout

Wyeast 1968 @62deg F (Edit: will be using Wyeast 1098)

Mash: Single Infusion @152deg F

OG:1.056
FG:1.011-1.013
IBU: 31
SRM: 13

A few questions:
1) Is there a better choice of yeast to get me a clean malt-forward flavor?
2) Should I be mashing at a lower temp? Attenuation with the 1968 is putting the FG at 1.018 which seems way too sweet for this.
3) Is there anything else I should consider?
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:42 PM   #7
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I always hear biscuit malt mentioned as giving warm bread notes to a beer. I've used it in milds, but never in a pale ale.
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:55 PM   #8
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I would just use a neutral yeast like US-05. It will attenuate better than 1968. Plus with that recipe if you use an ESB yeast, you're making an ESB. If you want it to be a pale ale, I would use a california yeast. Good luck with your brew!
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:57 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ong View Post
I always hear biscuit malt mentioned as giving warm bread notes to a beer. I've used it in milds, but never in a pale ale.
I think bicuit and victory are very similar.

And I forgot to mention in my last post that your recipe looks pretty good for what you're going for! Cheers!
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Old 11-01-2012, 03:48 AM   #10
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I'd use a more neutral British yeast like WY1098. Will attenuate more but leave some esters behind.


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