Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Open to All!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Moving to full-volume boils... 8 or 10 gallon kettle?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-22-2012, 06:13 PM   #11
Whattawort
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: East Bumfark, Yonder
Posts: 912
Liked 100 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 34

Default

I have an 8gal pot and if I'm not vigilant during the boil, it would get incredibly messy in no time. Fermcap and a fan are my best friends when it's time for a hop addition. Go as big as you can afford. A valve is a requirement though.


__________________
Bottled - Swamp Water Mead
Kegged - Ryerish Red
Fermenting - Plinius Maior

“For a quart of Ale is a dish for a king.”
― William Shakespeare
Whattawort is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 06:18 PM   #12
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 237 Times on 197 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

or this:
http://www.instawares.com/stainless-....htm?view=list

or this
http://spikebrewing.com/collections/...ttle-1-coupler


__________________
_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 06:28 PM   #13
Golddiggie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Golddiggie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Between here and there, and everywhere
Posts: 12,063
Liked 483 Times on 423 Posts
Likes Given: 266

Default

IF you're set on going with purchasing the kettle, then go at least with a 10 gallon one. IF you're handy though, and have even a few [pretty] basic power tools, you can go the keggle route. Then you have plenty of room to brew whatever you want. Keep in mind, when you want to brew something bigger, you'll probably want a longer boil, so you'll need more capacity. Going too small now means you'll either be limiting yourself on those batch sizes later, or you'll need to get another kettle for those batches.

I started off with making my own 8 gallon [aluminum] kettle before getting a 10 gallon Blichmann BoilerMaker. I then made keggles to use. I sold the first boil keggle, making a replacement (configured a bit differently). I also made my keggle mash tun (made that before either BK). Since going that route, I wouldn't purchase a pre-made kettle in the 10-15 gallon size range. IMO, a keggle is a better idea. Especially if you can score a base keg at a reasonable rate (which you can do if you know where/how to look).

If you're interested in going that route, PM me and I'll send details.
__________________
Hopping Tango Brewery

跟猴子比丟屎 ・ Gun HOE-tze bee DIO-se

On Tap: Caramel Ale, Mocha Porter II, MO SMaSH IPA
Waiting/Carbonating: 12.5% Wee Honey II, 8.9% Old Ale, English Brown Ale, Lickah ESB, Mocha Porter II
Fermenting
K1:
K2: Epic mead
K3: TripSix
On Deck: Caramel Ale
Aging:mead
Mead [bottled]:Oaked Wildflower Traditional, Mocha Madness, Blackberry Melomel, maple wine
Golddiggie is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2012, 06:45 PM   #14
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,634
Liked 276 Times on 223 Posts
Likes Given: 1248

Default

Get a 20 gallon!

I do nothing but 11 gal batches (2 carboys full) now. It literally only takes about 20% more time to make 50% more beer per batch! You can also make 5-6 gal batches with a 20 gal pot. Another benefit is a larger pot is actually more efficient on your large propane burner so I can actually heat my mash water in about 15 minutes and bring my 13 gal preboil runnings to boil in another 15 minutes!
__________________
Next up: Amber Ale
Primary 1&2: 90 Min IPA clone
Primary 3&4: Belgian Wit
Keg #1: White Mosaic Pale Ale
Keg #2: Empty
Drinking: Amber Ale, White Mosaic Pale Ale
Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 12:55 AM   #15
blakelyc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Bergenfield, New Jersey
Posts: 479
Liked 38 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Wow, lots of feedback! Just to be clear, I really don't have an interesting in brewing larger batches... I have trouble consuming everything I make now. I do want to brew more, different beers, and higher quality beers. Based on that, it sounds like 15-gallon kettle or a keggle is the best option....... And I do like the looks of shiny keggles..... Hrm....
blakelyc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 01:46 AM   #16
treehousebrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 75
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I upgraded to a 10-gal megapot at the beginning of the summer and love it. Now, I do BIAB, so maybe for a multi-vessel system something else might be better, but I feel like anything bigger and I wouldn't be able to do 2.5 or 3 gallon batches without really messing up my volumes. And I like the flexibility to do 5.5-6 or 2.5-3. I'm also in your boat where I really am brewing more than I can consume in a reasonable amount of time.
treehousebrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 02:30 AM   #17
blakelyc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Bergenfield, New Jersey
Posts: 479
Liked 38 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

I really, really like the act of brewing, so I got a 5-gallon pot in which I have started doing 1-gallon biab. It is a lot if time for 5 or 6 bombers, but I love to tinker with recipes and I don't feel bad about dumping a batch if it goes south.... Tons of flexibility with that kind of set up, for sure.

I have found my small-batch beers to be far superior to my partial-boil 5-gallon batches... There are probably lots of reasons for that, but I figure having the ability to directly scale-up recipes with little or no proportional change will remove at least one variable. The complexity of this very simple process is remarkable!
blakelyc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 02:30 AM   #18
megadave5000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 19
Default

Just thought I'd chime in here on the 8 gal vs 10 gal kettle as I was grappling with this same decision about two months ago. I ended up going with a 10 gal pot with thermometer and ball valve ... I have zero regrets. I think with an 8 gal kettle you're going to risk boil overs, but an additional item to think about is how you're going to bring this to a boil. My 10 gal kettle sits nicely on my stovetop covering two burners (both the left-side or both the right-side, I have four electric burners) with just a bit of burners not covered by the pot. I put both of the burners on high and it takes about an hour to bring a 5.5 gallon batch up to boiling, much more than 6 gallons or so and you probably want to use a propane turkey fryer or something. If the kettle were any wider it would be unwieldy - any taller and it would start to get very close to the microwave hood. So for me, the 10 gallon size was an excellent buy. It sounds like I'm in your same position, I have trouble drinking all the beer that I make - so the capacity and functionality of a 10 gal kettle was perfect for me and sounds like it may be right in your wheelhouse as well.

Reason: grammar
megadave5000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 02:36 AM   #19
blakelyc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Bergenfield, New Jersey
Posts: 479
Liked 38 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Hi megadave: Good point on the shape... I will be using a bayou classic sq14, which on 3 gallon boils takes about 22 minutes to get to a full boil from cold start. If I go with a keggle, which has a different height/width ratio than my current pot, I will have to refigure all my system characteristics.

So to summarize the feedback so far: 10 gallons minimum, 15 maximum, ball valve absolutely required, thermometer nice-to-have.
blakelyc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 03:14 AM   #20
FATC1TY
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Atlanta Area, GA
Posts: 1,617
Liked 138 Times on 113 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by blakelyc View Post

So to summarize the feedback so far: 10 gallons minimum, 15 maximum, ball valve absolutely required, thermometer nice-to-have.

Thermometer isn't needed. It's a boil, or it's not. Unless you want to use it to check temp of wort being chilled..

Sight glass would rate higher on my list than a temp reading, but you might find it useful.


__________________
----------
Bubba's Backyard Brewery
FATC1TY is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I'm moving to full boils!!! SCORE!!! raven1a General Beer Discussion 13 05-12-2012 02:35 AM
Brew Kettle size for full boils southsidesox Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 03-08-2012 05:59 PM
Full 5 gallon boils bluelou6 General Techniques 7 10-25-2007 01:52 AM
steeping for full volume boils Willy Boner Extract Brewing 4 07-01-2007 01:38 AM
Moving to full 5 gal boils 2nd Street Brewery General Techniques 4 10-12-2006 05:42 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS