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Old 10-18-2012, 09:04 PM   #11
SimonHucko
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Jun 2011
Owego, NY
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sounds like the sort of thing that would only really be sustainable in a ciry, where people don't have the room to brew in their tiny apartments. other than that, you're looking at a nice add on to a brewery/LHBS, I think.

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Old 10-19-2012, 12:50 AM   #12
SteveCourtright
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Oct 2012
Evanston, IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LarsonLE

Yeah... unfortunately that's the case. It just seems like a great, fun idea.

Do you remember the names of those businesses? Also how was the beer you made at the BOP's?
The first was Chicago Brew on Premise and the second was at an old firehouse on Clybourn, can't remember the name. The beer at the first was not good and it closed quickly. The beer at the second was terrific. We had a blast brewing at the second, the kids would make root beer when we made beer.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 01:30 AM   #13
45_70sharps
 
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The only way I can see this working is if it's in a brewshop with the extra room or a brewpub with extra room.
That would make the brew your own a draw to the primary business. If the brew your own customers took up home brewing and you had a brew shop, you would make money setting them up and selling them supplies.
Think of the profit potential from one batch of beer. Then think of the time ( with you coaching them ) to brew and the time that you have the beer there fermenting. You tie up a lot of retail space for a little cash.

MAYBE if you could hook up with a homebrew shop that had room. It would be a draw to their store. I don't know of many homebrew shops with the extra space though.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 02:13 AM   #14
Phunhog
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Sep 2008
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I think anyone of us could use our existing "brewery" to do a BOP...depending on your state law of course. Lets say someone wants a special beer for a party, wedding, or just to have around. They could hire you for your brewing skills and buy the ingredients through you. You could do all the "work"....they would just have to pitch the yeast so that it is technically "their beer". You could then ferment and bottle/keg it for them. Like I said though you would have to check with your state laws but on a federal level I believe that is well within the homebrewing law.
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Old 10-19-2012, 03:37 AM   #15
45_70sharps
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phunhog View Post
I think anyone of us could use our existing "brewery" to do a BOP...depending on your state law of course. Lets say someone wants a special beer for a party, wedding, or just to have around. They could hire you for your brewing skills and buy the ingredients through you. You could do all the "work"....they would just have to pitch the yeast so that it is technically "their beer". You could then ferment and bottle/keg it for them. Like I said though you would have to check with your state laws but on a federal level I believe that is well within the homebrewing law.
I think you are going to have to meet commercial kitchen requirements. Not sure that that entails or what it would be state by state.
I'm also not sure how this would apply to brewing since it's not cooking food, but it is comsumed.... Hmmm...

I've got friends that make and sell BBQ sauce. They use the kitchen at the VFW or something like that to be in compliance. I should say they use it enough to claim that's where it all comes from.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 04:14 AM   #16
a_hard
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Sep 2012
PHX, AZ
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The biggest issue with bop is customers. Like many said tying it in with another business is ideal. A LHBS would introduce people to brewing then buy from you. A nano or micro brewery would allow you to make money from brewing. I would also add from an economic standpoint making bulk wort and split that into batches.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:04 AM   #17
lgilmore
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Oct 2011
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This has me thinking about the BOP place I started. I made a couple visits, made good beer, had a good time. But it was over 200 bucks a visit for the brewing and bar tab. Plus the drive home was a bit too far to be that buzzed. The other thing, you made 6 cases at a time. I like a little variety. The cost and batch size was just too much. So I began making from home. No drive, costs are low and the beer of the house isn't $5 a pint.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 12:11 PM   #18
logan3825
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Sep 2010
Madison, Wisconsin
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Quote:
It is usually stated that whoever pitches the yeast brews the beer. I even contacted my state (CA) ABC and they told me that there are no regulations/licenses regarding BOP...they consider it "remote location homebrewing" (their words).
That would limit the homebrew to 100-200 gallons per location. What percentage of your allocated gallons would you be willing to sacrifice? Also, depending on the wording at the state level, it may limit it to a residence and not a business location.

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 12:21 PM   #19
bullinachinashop
 
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The Brew Kettle does a great job and has a great business. http://www.thebrewkettle.com/
Very sucessfull but a huge undertaking!
Bull

 
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Old 10-19-2012, 12:35 PM   #20
omokoro
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Mar 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by logan3825 View Post
That would limit the homebrew to 100-200 gallons per location. What percentage of your allocated gallons would you be willing to sacrifice? Also, depending on the wording at the state level, it may limit it to a residence and not a business location.
The customer is the person with the 100-200 limit, since they are the one's brewing the beer.

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