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Old 11-13-2012, 01:56 PM   #21
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I think the typical range is somewhere between 1 and 1.5qts, so you can go at least a bit beyond 1.25 without any trouble. I couldn't really tell you where the effective limit is, though I believe Yooper suggested earlier in this thread that as much as 2 gallons per pound would work also - not sure if that'd start to eat into your efficiency at that point though, which I guess goes to your question.
I know you mean quarts here, but just to clarify for the newer folks that read this

I think I've heard some of the BIAB folks go as high as 3 quarts/lb for full boils - 7.5 gallon boil on 10lbs of grain. That to me seems REALLY thin, but they do it in Australia a lot I gues.


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Old 11-13-2012, 02:08 PM   #22
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I think the typical range is somewhere between 1 and 1.5qts, so you can go at least a bit beyond 1.25 without any trouble. I couldn't really tell you where the effective limit is, though I believe Yooper suggested earlier in this thread that as much as 2 gallons per pound would work also - not sure if that'd start to eat into your efficiency at that point though, which I guess goes to your question.
Traditionally, mashing uses 1.25- 2 quarts of water per pound of grain. But there are some BIABers who use a much higher ratio. I never have, but I have used 2 quarts of water per pound when I had a smaller mash.

I remember someone (John Palmer?) saying that in general you want to use no more than about 3 quarts of water per pound of grain total, including the sparge. I've kept that in the back of my mind for years- but of course the BIAB folks have successfully been doing that or thinner.

Still, for traditional mini-mashes, I'd keep the 2 quarts of water per pound of grain as a max until I had more experience with thinner mashes.
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Old 11-13-2012, 03:12 PM   #23
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I know you mean quarts here, but just to clarify for the newer folks that read this
D'oh!!!
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