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Old 10-16-2012, 12:11 AM   #1
bduane
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Which ingredients have impact on how quickly the beer is ready?

I hear many people say that wheat beers can go "from grain to glass" in as little as 10 days and still be tasty. What makes wheat beers not taste "green" when they are young? Is it the yeast strains typically used with wheat beers, or does wheat itself somehow prevent or mask the "green" flavors?

 
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Old 10-16-2012, 02:13 AM   #2
Malticulous
 
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Pitching enough healthy yeast and good temperature control are most important, no flaws to age out.

 
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Old 10-16-2012, 03:23 PM   #3
bduane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malticulous View Post
Pitching enough healthy yeast and good temperature control are most important, no flaws to age out.
So you are saying what makes "green" beer "green" is mostly flaws, and if you brew a beer perfectly without these flaws it should taste the same as it would after 7 days in the primary as it would after 3-6 weeks of aging?

I find this hard to believe, aren't a lot of the "green" flavors natural byproducts of yeast that would happen no matter how perfect your process is (and flavor of the yeast themselves?).

 
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Old 10-16-2012, 03:30 PM   #4
MrOH
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Lower gravity beers tend to be the quickest. This is because since the yeast have less sugars to consume, they can begin the clean-up process earlier, and since there is less to clean up, they finish that earlier as well. It doesn't hurt to use a fast fermenting, high floccing yeast strain, either.
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:08 AM   #5
Malticulous
 
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The clean up yeast do only takes a day or so (unless the fermentation was so out of control they went dormant before they had consumed all the by-products). The real conditioning is solids falling out of solution. Since wheat beers can be served cloudy that part of conditioning is not necessary.

 
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:25 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malticulous View Post
The clean up yeast do only takes a day or so (unless the fermentation was so out of control they went dormant before they had consumed all the by-products). The real conditioning is solids falling out of solution. Since wheat beers can be served cloudy that part of conditioning is not necessary.
Exactly. The "clean up" process is about 24 hours, give or take. So, by the time the beer has been at FG for three days, it's ready to package if it's clear or clearing.

Using flocculant yeast helps alot with clarity at that stage.

I think complex flavors take more time to meld, though. It's not that an oatmeal stout will taste "green" at 10 days (not if it's well made) but the roastiness might not have mellowed and melded with the crystal malt yet. But certainly by 3-4 weeks, it would be fine.

Higher gravity beers might take a little longer to ferment out, but even they will be finished fermenting in 7-10 days, max. If they are fermented at a proper temperature with the proper amount of yeast, they shouldn't taste "green" either, but may take a few weeks or longer for the alcohol flavor to smooth out. (I'm talking about 1.090+ beers).

A barley wine, due to the high alcohol and high amount of hops, may improve for 6 months or more, but most aless won't improve much after a few weeks.
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:36 AM   #7
Xpertskir
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You could do all of the above and turn around a beer quickly, or you could build up your pipeline and be patient which is the better option.

 
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:17 PM   #8
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I just brewed a nice Alt beer that went from mash to glass in 10 days. I never rush my beers, and intended to secondary this, maybe cold crash it, etc.
But I took a reading after 10 days and it had dropped to 1.012, and tasted so good I could not wait to get it in the keg...so I didn't.

OG - 1.048, 46 IBU's, 18 SRM. (2 packs of hydrated S-05 yeast to 6.25-gallons in the carboy)

It has now been in the keg for over a week, is nicely carbonated, and I is a very nice beer. I'm brewing it again next weekend so I don't run out!
I think Yooper has a good point about flavors "blending" and mellowing out, though. The flavors from the de-bittered black have mellowed and merged with the rest of the beer, t does taste better after having been in the keg for another week, as typical.
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:32 PM   #9
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Would pitching a starter of healthy yeast at the end of fermentation be an option? Let the new healthy yeast handle all the clean-up of the by-products left by the old tired yeast.
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...it's fine if it's fermenting.

 
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Old 10-18-2012, 04:23 PM   #10
bduane
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpertskir View Post
You could do all of the above and turn around a beer quickly, or you could build up your pipeline and be patient which is the better option.
Of course a nice pipeline is the intention here eventually, but i started a pipeline before only to discover 20 gallons/5-6 weeks in to my pipeline that I had a serious flaw in my process using the no-chill method that was ruining my beers, so that was quite discouraging to have 20 gallons of freshly brewed bad beer!

So now that I have got a plate chiller and pump and changed my process again, I would like to "proof" my process first with a couple of quick beers before I gamble again my starting a pipeline.

 
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