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Old 12-15-2012, 03:09 AM   #251
kingboomer
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So I have a question on the process. Does this need a certain amount of headspace, or would it be OK to fill the jar completely? Sorry if I missed this in an earlier post.


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Old 12-15-2012, 03:58 AM   #252
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingboomer View Post
So I have a question on the process. Does this need a certain amount of headspace, or would it be OK to fill the jar completely? Sorry if I missed this in an earlier post.
I would make sure to leave a little space for a CO2 blanket to form but that should not require too much headspace.
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Old 12-15-2012, 05:21 AM   #253
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Originally Posted by sonofgrok View Post

The red looks really tasty. Wondering what it tastes like! I was thinking about microwave or stove top pasteurization myself for those that were worried about storage but my wine keeps disappearing before I can experiment.
I can sympathize about the shrinking inventory. Once my taste buds return, coming down with a respiratory something, I will see if I cannot get a better description plus a description from another person. The red one keeps me smacking my lips as I try to come up with a descriptive.
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:30 PM   #254
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Picked up a 55 cup (dry rice capacity) rice cooker. Hoping to find time to make it downtown to the asian market this weekend and start a 3-5 gallon batch of this. I like the idea of the different flavors, and plan to gift it out regularly to some friends, so I'm going to do a large batch and then start playing with flavors in small quantities. Thanks for the thread grok, good info.

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Old 12-15-2012, 07:39 PM   #255
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I have a 25lb. bag of thai jasmine rice and 500g of shanghai yeast cake. All I need is enough glass to hold it all.

 
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Old 12-15-2012, 10:18 PM   #256
jdowling
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Great thread. I have always enjoyed sake but it always sounded like a huge pain to make.

This sounds so easy and seems to be getting good results so I'm totally giving this a try today!

 
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Old 12-16-2012, 03:56 AM   #257
kingboomer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonofgrok View Post
I would make sure to leave a little space for a CO2 blanket to form but that should not require too much headspace.

Thanks man, now to get the gear together. I can't wait!


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Old 12-17-2012, 11:23 AM   #258
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I made a trip to an Asian supermarket while I was in LA. There were 2 kinds of starters, and I got them both:


"Angel-brand Rice Leaven" which comes in 8g packets similar to dry powdered yeast, and


"Shanghai Yeast Cakes" which are the ubiquitous Chinese yeast balls.


From the Wikipedia article on Chinese fermentation starters, I learned that there are basically 3 types of starters, all composed of various yeasts, molds, and bacteria:

Small starter - made with molds of the Rhizopus and Mucor genus, this starter supposedly generates less heat and produces wine more neutral in flavor
The rice leaven packets list Rhizopus oryzae as an ingredient, so they're probably of this type.

Large starter - the mold here is Aspergillus oryzae (the species commonly called koji); almost all famous alcoholic drinks in China use this starter
Since they're more common, I bet that the yeast balls are "large starters".

Red starter - yeast and Monascus purpureus, the species responsible for red yeast rice
I didn't see any of these beside the other starters. I did find red-colored rice in a different section (with other types of rice), but I'm not sure if that contains active cultures.


The instructions for the yeast balls are on the back of the package in Chinese only, so here they are, translated:

Quote:
To make Jiuniang (glutinous rice pudding):
Open an individual packet and grind the 2 yeast balls into powder, about 20 g. Soak 1.2 kg [about 6 cups] of glutinous rice [also called sweet or sticky rice] for 3 hours in summer or 5 hours in winter. Drain and steam the rice until done. Add some cold water and bring the temperature to about 30 C [86 F]. Mix the powdered starter with the rice and pack the mixture down in a large enough vessel. Make a hole in the middle, 5cm in diameter and all the way to the bottom. Cover the vessel and keep warm, around 25-30 C. After 24-36 hours, check the hole for sweet rice juice. When all the rice has softened up, the Jiuniang is ready. Refrigerate and enjoy.

To make Huangjiu ("yellow wine"):
Put the Jiuniang as prepared above in a large vessel and add 2.4 L of filtered water. Cover and let it ferment. After 24 hours, you'll see the rice clump up and float on top of the liquid. Use a clean utensil to mix it up. After repeating this for 7 days (more or less, depending on room temperature), the rice solids will have sunk to the bottom. The liquid is mostly colorless at this point. Strain the liquid out and let it settle, then you can heat pasteurize it and age it in the bottle. It will slowly take on color and become "Yellow Wine".
So there it is, the "right" way to do it, though I didn't read the instructions until after I started my first batch which is now on day 15. I used both starters in a sort of free-for-all. I'll update with details and pictures tomorrow :P

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Old 12-17-2012, 12:35 PM   #259
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Just a heads up about red yeast rice:

It contains a naturally occurring statin, which is the main class of drugs used to control cholesterol (eg Lipitor, Crestor, etc). If you are on any cholesterol, heart/cardiovascular, blood pressure, or diabetes medications, you should talk to your doctor about it first.

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:27 PM   #260
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emjay
Just a heads up about red yeast rice:

It contains a naturally occurring statin, which is the main class of drugs used to control cholesterol (eg Lipitor, Crestor, etc). If you are on any cholesterol, heart/cardiovascular, blood pressure, or diabetes medications, you should talk to your doctor about it first.
Yeah that's the only application I was aware of before now... I've never seen it used in food or alcohol products.

 
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