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Old 10-10-2012, 05:33 AM   #1
itsernst
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So i just tasted my Chinook IPA and it has a good flavor to it, however I am skeptical as to if it may be infected. There is a hint of sour to it, which I could see with an IPA, and trails left in the bottle were odd looking. There was quite a bit of sediment in the bottle as well, which is where HBT comes in. Would heavy sediment in the bottom of the bottle cause these large bubbles?

I left it in secondary for much longer than it required and it attenuated down to 1.011, so it was definitely finished cleaning up. Has a great head, where I think the sourness comes from but alsothe Chinook hops are prevalent in the finish as well giving it a good flavor.


Thanks in advance
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Old 10-10-2012, 07:43 AM   #2
uncommonsense
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What yeast did you use

 
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Old 10-10-2012, 08:01 AM   #3
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An IPA, neither English nor American, should be sour. I'm guessing it's an infection. All bottle conditioned beers will have sediment like that, so that's not the problem. How long do you consider to be a long time in the secondary? I've come to the realization that the "secondary" fermentation is a myth and does more harm than good in the great majority of beers. Beer needs to sit in contact with yeast for a while to clean up off flavors. I've left beers in the primary for several weeks, up to 4 or 5, with no ill effects. With modern yeast the risk of autolysis is very low. Transferring from the primary to secondary introduces the risk for infection and oxidation without serving any benefits.
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Old 10-10-2012, 12:09 PM   #4
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Also,secondary should have very little head space. You don't want o2 in there at the point where not much co2 is being produced. That can lead to infections.
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Old 10-10-2012, 02:19 PM   #5
itsernst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncommonsense
what yeast did you use
s-05
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Old 10-10-2012, 02:24 PM   #6
itsernst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chemicalcraig
An IPA, neither English nor American, should be sour. I'm guessing it's an infection. All bottle conditioned beers will have sediment like that, so that's not the problem. How long do you consider to be a long time in the secondary? I've come to the realization that the "secondary" fermentation is a myth and does more harm than good in the great majority of beers. Beer needs to sit in contact with yeast for a while to clean up off flavors. I've left beers in the primary for several weeks, up to 4 or 5, with no ill effects. With modern yeast the risk of autolysis is very low. Transferring from the primary to secondary introduces the risk for infection and oxidation without serving any benefits.
Secondary for 3 weeks after primary for about 14 days. The other thing is the ferm temps were on the high side as well, at one point probably around 78 or 79.
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Old 10-10-2012, 02:24 PM   #7
itsernst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr
Also,secondary should have very little head space. You don't want o2 in there at the point where not much co2 is being produced. That can lead to infections.
So this could be a problem too as my 6.5 had quite a bit of headspace on it.
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Old 10-10-2012, 02:33 PM   #8
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That combined with high ferment temps. You should've left it on the yeast cake for another week to clean up & settle out clear or slightly misty. Beer should at least be at FG before racking to secondary anyway.
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Old 10-11-2012, 11:22 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsernst

s-05
See I've noticed if I get a yeasty pour with that yeast I get a tartness but if I get relativly clean pour its fine.

 
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Old 10-11-2012, 06:53 PM   #10
itsernst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncommonsense View Post
See I've noticed if I get a yeasty pour with that yeast I get a tartness but if I get relativly clean pour its fine.
This is quite possible. I threw another 2 in the fridge tonight and will test again. I thought i did this last night but apparently I need to label my bottles what I have as it definitely wasn't an IPA.

It is possible the tartness is a better explanation than sour, although i think in fermentation language sour is automatically assumed as being an infection.
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