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Old 10-09-2012, 06:43 PM   #1
Wild Duk
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Default First time bottling

I have been kegging since I started brewing 5 yrs ago. I'm gonna bottle my first batch. It's an IPA at about 8.0ABV. I have some light DME and was wondering the process and how much to use.
There is a calculator on BrewSmith that asks for the beer temp. Is that the temp it fermented at or the temp it will carb at..
Thx


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Old 10-09-2012, 06:48 PM   #2
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That is the temp it is when you go to bottle it. The calculator in BS works, or there are several online as well - this one will tell you how much DME to use:
http://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/

Take the amount of DME, or corn sugar needed, boil for a few minutes and put it into your bottling bucket. Rack onto that, allow the racking process to gently stir the solution so it gets mixed throughout, then bottle.


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Old 10-10-2012, 01:36 AM   #3
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Thx. How much water do i use???
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Old 10-10-2012, 03:00 AM   #4
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Doesn't matter, a few cups, enough to dissolve the DME
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Old 10-10-2012, 03:46 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilDeadAsh View Post
That is the temp it is when you go to bottle it.
Sorry, that is wrong. It is the highest temperature the beer reached during the fermentation process. It's about calculating the amount of residual CO2 in the beer before you start the process of adding more to it.
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Old 10-10-2012, 03:07 PM   #6
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Thanks tek, and just so this doesnt cause confusion for the OP - I've confirmed I was incorrect, and tek is right. As the beer gets to a higher temp during the fermentation process, it will tend to lose some residual CO2. You need to account for this when calculating the amount of sugar to use in your priming solution by adding a little more to make up for what was lost during fermentation.

That said, the difference in the amount of sugar needed will generally be pretty small; for example, the amount of sugar needed for 2 vol CO2 @ 68 degrees is 3.1 oz, while @ 80 degrees is 3.4 oz
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilDeadAsh View Post
Thanks tek, and just so this doesnt cause confusion for the OP - I've confirmed I was incorrect, and tek is right. As the beer gets to a higher temp during the fermentation process, it will tend to lose some residual CO2. You need to account for this when calculating the amount of sugar to use in your priming solution by adding a little more to make up for what was lost during fermentation.

That said, the difference in the amount of sugar needed will generally be pretty small; for example, the amount of sugar needed for 2 vol CO2 @ 68 degrees is 3.1 oz, while @ 80 degrees is 3.4 oz
Thanks for a positive reply. I sometimes hesitate to jump into a discussion because some people get hot if one ventures to disagree. Thanks for double checking and posting back up to the OP. If more people responded like you... Cheers
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:40 AM   #8
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Thx all. Kinda figured it was the Fermentation temp as the beer will carbonate at any temp, just how long depends on it.... But it does sound like splitting hairs here as the beer will retain CO2 during cooler ferm. Temps but no where does it ask how long it aged for. Aging will off gas too...

Thx.
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Old 10-11-2012, 10:31 PM   #9
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Splitting hairs, but no, aging shouldn't matter. At least, in terms of the gas law. Temperature and pressure give soluble volume of gas. Period. You might lose some CO2 if you have an open fermentation (remember, CO2 will move into headspace as the liquid warms). And of course if there is a swing of temperature upwards, like when you do a diacytel rest, you will lose CO2 that you won't get back when you cool again unless perhaps you are fermenting under pressure.
But it's all nitpicking. Very few of us are lab guys or have to make a living making sure each batch is the same as the last one.
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Old 10-11-2012, 10:37 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tektonjp View Post
Sorry, that is wrong. It is the highest temperature the beer reached during the fermentation process. It's about calculating the amount of residual CO2 in the beer before you start the process of adding more to it.
Close, and I'm splitting hairs too, but it's actually the highest temp the beer reached after active fermentation has ended. If the beer gets warmer after fermentation ends, it will lose more CO2. If the beer starts out with a warm fermentation, but is cooled while the yeast are still producing CO2, it will hold the amount of CO2 that corresponds to the lower temp.


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