Show us your foraged mushroom finds!! - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Food and Beverage > Cooking & Pairing > Show us your foraged mushroom finds!!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-07-2012, 01:17 PM   #1
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts



A conversation about mushrooms popped up in the cider forum, i though why not get something going over here where it belongs. This year i got 4 chicken mushrooms, a sponge/cauliflower mushroom, loads and loads of boletus badius (last photo), and a few boletus edulis / porcini / king bolete, one of which was a whopper at 600 g. As well as shaggy manes, gem studded puffballs. The season is in full swing so i expect more!
Click image for larger version

Name:	2012-09-13 12.37.32.jpg
Views:	402
Size:	60.1 KB
ID:	78636   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_9188.jpg
Views:	389
Size:	39.7 KB
ID:	78637   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_9182.jpg
Views:	394
Size:	27.8 KB
ID:	78638   Click image for larger version

Name:	be2.jpg
Views:	387
Size:	33.8 KB
ID:	78639   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_9249.jpg
Views:	377
Size:	58.8 KB
ID:	78640  


 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-07-2012, 01:25 PM   #3
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts


boletus badius beer stew:
start the stew by frying whatever veg you like in some butter: carrot, celery, onion, etc. add fresh thyme and bay leaves, black pepper. when they're soft dump in Beer! nothing too hoppy, go for malty. and maybe a stock cube. a good splash of malt vinegar or cider vinegar. let that cook for a while, at least 30 minutes, until the flavors get to know each other. cover and leave it for hours to slow cook if you can.
roughly slice the mushrooms, dust them in flower, heat butter until foaming subsides (or light oil), fry the mushys very hot until they start to brown, turn them to brown a little bit on all sides. grind some black pepper in there. dump in a good glug cheap whisky and flame it, take it off heat as the flame dies out. add this to the stew a few minutes before serving, with all its juices. the flour should thicken the sauce a little bit, if not then mix some flour in a bit of cold water (or beer) and add that in, let it cook for a minute to thicken. taste for salt. top with fresh parsley, and serve with an island of creamy mash potato or celeriac or something like that.
boletus badius harvest:
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_9248.jpg
Views:	384
Size:	40.9 KB
ID:	78641  

gratus fermentatio Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2012, 12:28 PM   #4
Goofynewfie
Recipes 
 
May 2012
Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 1,613
Liked 314 Times on 207 Posts


does anybody know a good reference for which wild mushrooms are edible?
__________________
You cant always be young but you can always be immature

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2012, 06:32 PM   #5
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts


where do you live? for north america try the classic National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms

although i should say, going out with a guide book is not a good strategy for beginners. going out with someone who knows, and learning 5 or 6 easy to identify species is your best bet for starting out. chicken mushroom, hen of the woods, oyster mushroom, shaggy mane, etc. then once you're home with them read about them in the book and learn the identifying features. avoid anything that has poisonous lookalikes until you are experienced

gratus fermentatio Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2012, 07:58 PM   #6
TheDudeLebowski
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
Mass
Posts: 2,208
Liked 302 Times on 241 Posts


I'd like to have a vegetable garden but I'm surrounded by water and tall pine trees. The only thing that grows in my yard is fungi. Literally I ran over a couple of puff balls mowing my yard over the weekend. Actually had a moral spring up next to my hops in the springtime. I've failed in any type of vegetable so last spring I ordered some plugs from www.thymegarden.com (shiitake, oysters, mane, chicken). Takes about a year to see any progress but I checked a couple of logs yesterday and there's a couple of mushrooms peeking out. I was hoping to go big and have my brother who's a landscaper get me some big logs to innoculate but that's another story. Kinda small now but hopefully will get something next year. Somehow I think next year is going to be a war with the squirrels and chipmunks. Bring it on!

gratus fermentatio Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 09:38 AM   #7
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts


good luck. my parents had good success with shiitake plugs in logs
i like young gem-studded puffballs, but they are not the most exciting on the palate. love lion's mane
i was looking into growing oyster mushrooms on spent brewing grain, but haven't been convinced that it will be as easy as i had hoped. seems it will be too rich and too wet, but diluted out with straw or sawdust or coffee grounds might work well. if i had a garage or shed i would have a crack at it but in my apartment, it's not happening. i thought maybe shredded brewing supply boxes (i get everything in the post) and newspaper mixed 60:40 with spent grain, hung in plastic bags and inoculated with a high % of sterile-grown mycelium might do the trick. if anyone tries this let me know!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2012, 08:09 AM   #8
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts


really good year for porcini here
Click image for larger version

Name:	porchy2.jpg
Views:	263
Size:	35.2 KB
ID:	79831  

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2012, 02:59 AM   #9
thumpi
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Oaklans, Cali
Posts: 6


nice boletus up there. There will be tons of chanterelles at my college hopefully in the next week or two. The first rain of the season happened last week. Do you have any advice on drying mushrooms because there should be bags full of them there.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2012, 09:49 PM   #10
dinnerstick
 
dinnerstick's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
utrecht, netherlands
Posts: 2,019
Liked 271 Times on 198 Posts


i only have experience drying boletus, which i do regularly. i slice a bit less than 1 cm thick and then either string them with a needle and thick thread, and staple gun them to the wall (ghetto) so they hang horizontally, or place the slices on an oven rack, leave in a warm place. ideally you would want warm, not hot, temperature and lots of air movement. i put them next to my water heater which is in a little closet. not much air movement but great warm temp 24/7, and they are dry in a few days. if i need to kickstart the process i put them in a 50C oven for a few hours first, but it's probably better to avoid that kind of heat. i love chantarelles but have never dried them

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just thought I'd show off our latest acquisition. EoinMag Cooking & Pairing 8 12-30-2011 08:52 PM
Beef and Mushroom Stew with fruity Tripel base? Eigenmusic Cooking & Pairing 1 11-08-2009 05:13 AM
Need Mushroom recipes Laurel Cooking & Pairing 17 10-18-2008 08:24 AM
Chicken and wild mushroom pate with mild Orfy Cooking & Pairing 1 06-06-2007 08:23 PM
Hey! When did this show up? Cheesefood Cooking & Pairing 13 02-01-2007 12:38 AM


Forum Jump