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Old 10-07-2012, 11:59 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bduane
Well, I had no idea that the only downside to lines that are "too long" was just a slower pour, I always assumed that would cause foaming issues as well. If that is true that a slower pour is the only disadvantage, then I agree, it is silly to try to balance a home system so precisely, just give yourself a couple of extra feet and call it good!
Long lines will cause foam if they are out of the kegerator and get warm. If you keep them cold the worst thing that could happen is a short head.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bduane View Post
Well, I had no idea that the only downside to lines that are "too long" was just a slower pour, I always assumed that would cause foaming issues as well. If that is true that a slower pour is the only disadvantage, then I agree, it is silly to try to balance a home system so precisely, just give yourself a couple of extra feet and call it good!
Yes, it's much easier than turning the fridge temperature up or down, and trying to balance it all between 6 kegs! Longer lines might not be the correct answer to the calculation but it works and works well.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:16 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by JuanMoore View Post
Because they use the line balancing calculators designed for commercial systems. If you call them to complain about foaming most of them will tell you to turn the temp of your fridge/keezer/kegerator down to 34-36F. If your stout will be lightly carbed and /or stored cold, the 5' lines will probably work ok.
When you say stored cold I'm taking it you mean colder than 40/45? The stout at 45 will just be a mess?

 
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:20 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDFlow View Post
When you say stored cold I'm taking it you mean colder than 40/45? The stout at 45 will just be a mess?
It really depends on the carb level. A lot of people use very low carb levels for stouts, like under 1.8 vol, in which case you might be ok. If you're carbing to a higher level, you might need to drop the temp or get longer lines.
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Old 10-08-2012, 02:14 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuanMoore View Post
It really depends on the carb level. A lot of people use very low carb levels for stouts, like under 1.8 vol, in which case you might be ok. If you're carbing to a higher level, you might need to drop the temp or get longer lines.
Thanks, looks like I've got some more to learn.

 
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:24 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by JDFlow View Post
Thanks, looks like I've got some more to learn.
Huge understatement. There's always more to learn, no matter how long you've been at this hobby

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Old 10-08-2012, 08:33 AM   #17
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Several years ago the inventor of the forward seal faucets, Brad Amidzich, wrote an article about this whole issue. I firmly believe it is well worth reading.

The article is a pdf document that you might want to save for reference later on.
How I can get a better pour out of my Kegerator?

P-J

 
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:39 PM   #18
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Wow. That is a much greater response than I was expecting. And luckily all pointing in the same direction. The problem that I THOUGhT I had was that my lines were too long vs. my serving pressure causing low pressure in the line near the tap allowing some co2 to come out of solution after reading the line balance calculators. I'm curious to know, given that this is a home brew forum, why there would be stickies for "line balancing" when those calculators are largely irrelevant for the home brewer without any corresponding caveat.

As long as we are on the subject, I also have a faucet hooked up to beer gas, and have read that the line length is largely irrelevant due to the restriction plate in the tap. Have I been misinformed here, too?

 
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Old 10-08-2012, 06:07 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P-J View Post
Several years ago the inventor of the forward seal faucets, Brad Amidzich, wrote an article about this whole issue. I firmly believe it is well worth reading.

The article is a pdf document that you might want to save for reference later on.
How I can get a better pour out of my Kegerator?

P-J
Agreed. The grammar is terrible, but it has a lot of sound information. One of the few articles on line balancing I've ever seen that recognizes the fact that line resistance is not a constant.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eman79er View Post
As long as we are on the subject, I also have a faucet hooked up to beer gas, and have read that the line length is largely irrelevant due to the restriction plate in the tap. Have I been misinformed here, too?
For the most part that is correct. Because of the restrictor plate, the faucet will pour well with a wide variety of pressures at the tap. Beer gas is also very forgiving with the applied pressure, since the large percentage of N2 prevents the carbonation level from changing much even when the serving pressure is significantly lower than the equilibrium pressure.

If you really want a perfectly balanced system with beergas where the carbonation level never changes even a minuscule amount, then it becomes more complicated, and line length can become an issue. What most people do is simply start at ~25-30 psi and then turn the pressure up until they get a good pour, completely ignoring the equilibrium pressure and line length.
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Old 10-10-2012, 01:04 PM   #20
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How much beer is left in a 10-12 ft line?

If you don't drink it for a few days do you need to poor off that little bit or does it remain properly carbed because the faucet is shut?

 
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