Reusing a yeast cake this weekend - wash, or don't bother? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 10-05-2012, 01:34 PM   #1
stratslinger
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I'm going to be brewing up a double batch of a winter warmer this weekend, should come in around 1.071 OG. I've currently got an English mild in the fermenter that needs to be kegged, and I plan to repitch the yeast in that fermenter into the winter warmer. The English mild was around 1.036 OG, so effectively it was a 5 gallon starter.

Anyway, I'm trying to decide if I should attempt to wash the yeast, or if I should just wait until Sunday (brew day) to keg the mild, and then divide up the yeast cake between the two fermenters before getting the chilled wort into them.

There's obviously less effort involved in kegging Sunday and divvying up the cake then, so I'm leaning heavily toward this approach. Any significant downsides?



 
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:05 PM   #2
earwig
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Many people say they have good results without washing but there's just something unappealing about it to me. One downside that I can think of is that it would be harder to replicate the brew again if you really like it.



 
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:24 PM   #3
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You can wash it but the easiest thing to do is just keg the mild on the day you are brewing and dump the new beer directly on the cake.

 
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by earwig
Many people say they have good results without washing but there's just something unappealing about it to me. One downside that I can think of is that it would be harder to replicate the brew again if you really like it.
It's easy to replicate, just brew the mild again first...duh :-)

If I happen to have a cake ready to go I would just pitch onto it. I have heard that the only down side is that you might over pitch. Not sure how true it is.

 
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:32 PM   #5
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I'll do this once in a while if I'm feeling lazy. It was a mild so not too much hop particles in there but will have trub and maybe some dead yeast but probably fine for a winter warmer I would think.
I would make sure to add some yeast nutrient. The best thing to do though is wash the yeast or use fresh.

 
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Old 10-06-2012, 03:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shutupjojo View Post
I'll do this once in a while if I'm feeling lazy. It was a mild so not too much hop particles in there but will have trub and maybe some dead yeast but probably fine for a winter warmer I would think.
I would make sure to add some yeast nutrient. The best thing to do though is wash the yeast or use fresh.

dead yeast ARE yeast nutrient.

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Old 10-06-2012, 03:33 PM   #7
StinkyVp
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I would at least put some in a jar and let it sit in the fridge and then decant the beer off of the top.

 
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Old 10-06-2012, 05:25 PM   #8
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Quote:
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dead yeast ARE yeast nutrient.
I think most of us know this. Yeast nutrient is a good idea just because it is more of a complete supplement with vitamins and zinc. That's all.

 
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Old 10-07-2012, 12:38 PM   #9

I have lately gotten into the habit of brewing a lower OG batch, then within a week of kegging or bottling, brewing a higher OG batch with the same yeast. I have not been washing the yeast or making a starter - I just save it in a large ball jar in the fridge.

Next batch is a cream ale, followed by a robust porter and I will be reusing the yeast from the cream ale.

 
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Old 10-07-2012, 02:31 PM   #10
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I would "Rinse" it myself washing means your lowering the PH with acid. I want to get any break material and junk out of there.
I know people say they have had good luck with what you wanting to do so give it a try and see.


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