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Old 10-04-2012, 04:15 PM   #11
Noontime
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In addition to all the wonderful answers so far...it also allows some time for the yeast to settle to the bottom of the bottle. I don't mind drinking yeast but it's certainly a downside of bottle conditioning, so allowing the yeast to fall and pouring off the top of it is beneficial.


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Old 10-04-2012, 04:55 PM   #12
itsernst
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The other thing is the priming solution that you are using. I currently use corn sugar, but I don't fee like it gives me enough carbonation no matter how long I let it sit. Are there any other priming sugars that work "better" than any others?


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Old 10-04-2012, 04:59 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsernst View Post
The other thing is the priming solution that you are using. I currently use corn sugar, but I don't fee like it gives me enough carbonation no matter how long I let it sit. Are there any other priming sugars that work "better" than any others?
If ANY solution isn't giving you the carb level you want, it's not the type you're using, for all intents and purposes a fermentable is a fermentable, it's that you're not using the correct amount.

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Old 10-04-2012, 05:13 PM   #14
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Personally I use table sugar and never wait more than a week before my
brew is good. I think the advice for waiting three weeks stems from those
who prime with malt extract, because then the primed brew not only has
to carb then, but the green flavor of the newly added malt extract has
to condition out, which will take three weeks just like the orginal brew
did during fermentation.

 
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:14 PM   #15
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How do breweries carb up their bottles?? C02 I guess, just curious how its done...

 
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:17 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsernst
The other thing is the priming solution that you are using. I currently use corn sugar, but I don't fee like it gives me enough carbonation no matter how long I let it sit. Are there any other priming sugars that work "better" than any others?
There's some truth to this, which was news to me. A lot of craft breweries are actually turning to cane sugar to naturally carb their beers instead of corn sugar because corn sugar holds more moisture than cane, resulting in inconsistent carbonation. The corn sugar will absorb more moisture as it gets exposed to air and sits around. I had a 4 pound bag of corn sugar for priming bottles and I did notice that my beers resulted in lower carbonation than my estimates as time went by. I believe it was the Chris White from White Labs that was referring to this.

 
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:25 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyowolf View Post
How do breweries carb up their bottles?? C02 I guess, just curious how its done...
Some bottle condition. Some force carbonate. Some carbonate during secondary fermentation by maintaining the fermentation vessels under controlled pressure.

 
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:48 PM   #18
itsernst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
If ANY solution isn't giving you the carb level you want, it's not the type you're using, for all intents and purposes a fermentable is a fermentable, it's that you're not using the correct amount.

Search for information on carbing to style.
I was never saying that any solution was giving me the carb level i was requesting, I was just saying corn sugar does not seem to be a good fit for what I prefer.

I get that but there definitely is a science to how the sugar, depending on which one you use carbs the bottle. Different sugars will carb depending on many variables. Otherwise there would be a general consensus that everyone use X sugar because it primes the "best".

Obviously different styles call for different amounts of carb, but that isn't to say they call for all of the same carbs.
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:00 PM   #19
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Idunno, itsernst... at the end of conditioning, carbon dioxide is carbon dioxide, no matter where the yeast are getting the sugars that produced it.

You might see very slight variations in flavor, but think about it in terms of your total grain bill. In a five-gallon batch, you've got somewhere around a 4.5 ounces of priming, or, a quarter pound of corn sugar/cane sugar/extract/honey/whatever, versus pounds and pounds of grain and/or extract. Even in a 1.040 OG lawnmower beer, that's only something like 5% of your grain bill. Unless you're doing something crazy like priming with wort made from black patent, you're not using something that's strong enough to be very noticeable in such a small dose.

 
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:30 PM   #20
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Ok,let me clear up a couple of things. Carbonation & conditioning are two seperate entities. Carbonation takes an average of 3-4 weeks to be produced as pressure in the head space of the bottle. Conditioning,or aging takes about 1 week or more longer with an average gravity ale. That's why a pale ale may be carbed in 3 weeks or less,but the flavors & aromas won't be "conditioned" for another week or more. Fridge time of at least one week will give decent carb/clarity,but 2 weks is best for good head & longer lasting carbonation. Chill haze will appear,if at all,by the time the beers just start to cool down in the fridge. It'll take 3-5 days on average for it to settle like a fog.
As for priming sugars,they must be kept tightly sealed to keep moisture away from them. Otherwise,they can be comprimised as to amount/quality of carbonation. Raw cane sugar,known in the grocery store as demerara sugar,has a nice light brown sugar laced with honey flavor. Gives a bit more complexity & tiny bit of color when used for priming. Great stuff. Try using demerara in place of other sugars in a pale ale recipie,or darker for more flavor. Carbes just fine.
Just remember the old saying with us muzzel loader shooters; keep your powder dry! Same thing with sugars. How do I know these things you may wonder? Science is mostly planning & observation.


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