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Old 10-03-2012, 01:07 AM   #1
d_striker
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Dec 2010
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I've been brewing for a few years now. I've always batch sparged in the past and recently switched over to fly sparging as i finished building my vertical brew stand. My firt two batches on my new system have come out VERY astringent and more chill hazed than usual.

My crush is good and efficiency is where it should be (75-78%). I brew with RO water with salts added to the mash, sparge with RO, and add the remaining salts to the brew kettle.

I currently don't have a way to verify ph but I think I'm over sparging some way or another. My sparge rate is approximately 1.5 qt/minute with 168 degree water.

Shouldn't my RO fly sparge maintain a low enough ph to not extract tannins and phenols or should I try to dissolve the remaining salts to my sparge water to lower ph?



 
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Old 10-03-2012, 01:14 AM   #2
Frodo
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One thing to check is your final runnings - supposedly below 1.008 (I think, from Palmer) you can get tannin extraction.



 
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Old 10-03-2012, 01:15 AM   #3
d_striker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frodo View Post
One thing to check is your final runnings - supposedly below 1.008 (I think, from Palmer) you can get tannin extraction.
Isn't that because by that point of the sparge the mash ph has risen?

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 04:49 PM   #4
JJL
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, WI
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You could try treating your sparge water with phosphoric or lactic acid to drop the pH. Also, on the back end you could try adding gelatin. It's supposed to help remove some tannins.

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 05:00 PM   #5
d_striker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJL View Post
You could try treating your sparge water with phosphoric or lactic acid to drop the pH. Also, on the back end you could try adding gelatin. It's supposed to help remove some tannins.
Is there any harm in lowering my sparge water ph and then adding the other portion of my salts to the kettle (which would lower the ph even more)? In other words, is there any harm to the finished product with having my collected wort ph extremely low once I have collected it all in the boil kettle?

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 05:17 PM   #6
RM-MN
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I bought a digital pH meter similar to this one on Ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-in-1-Water...7e7f1a&vxp=mtr) because I suspected a problem with my water. This morning as I was brewing I collected a sample of wort just after doughing in and found a pH of 6.4. I had plenty of time to stir in some acid blend which a second sample revealed that it had brought the pH down to 5.2. For that much money I felt like I had made a good investment. It comes with calibration acids and I did verify calibration before I sampled since it had been over 4 months since using it and the calibration was right on.

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 05:32 PM   #7
afr0byte
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Aug 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d_striker View Post
Is there any harm in lowering my sparge water ph and then adding the other portion of my salts to the kettle (which would lower the ph even more)? In other words, is there any harm to the finished product with having my collected wort ph extremely low once I have collected it all in the boil kettle?
The salts being added to the kettle won't lower the pH. The only reason they do that in the mash is because they react with the malt to create acid, dropping the pH.

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Old 10-03-2012, 05:56 PM   #8
boscobeans
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Apr 2012
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Polyclar will also work to remove tannins from your brew at the back end. Add a few days before bottling/kegging and it will make a difference.

bosco

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 06:26 PM   #9
d_striker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boscobeans View Post
Polyclar will also work to remove tannins from your brew at the back end. Add a few days before bottling/kegging and it will make a difference.

bosco
I tried that on the last batch. I chilled to 28 degrees and added Polyclar. Helped a little with the haze but still tastes very astringent.

I would prefer to fix the problem upstream.

 
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Old 10-03-2012, 09:32 PM   #10
d_striker
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Dec 2010
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I guess I'm still confused as to why I'm extracting excessive tannins when sparging with RO water.

I thought RO water had no buffering capacity which means my mash bed pH should not rise. Or am I all wet here?



 
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