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Old 01-08-2013, 06:13 PM   #11
Soulshine
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Basically I did a 7 gallon batch to account for the trub and what I lose in the bottom of my conical fermenter:

Ingredients:
Amount Item
9.5 lb Light DME to replace Pilsner 2 Row malt (or 10.5lb LME)
8.4 lb Maris Otter Malt (22.0 SRM) - Mash at 152 degrees for 60 min
0.7 lb Belgian Biscuit Malt (22.0 SRM)- Mash at 152 degrees for 60 min.

2 oz Amarillo [9.50 %] (120 min)
2 oz Simcoe [11.10 %] (120 min)
2 oz Warrior [14.50 %] (120 min)
(Mix hops and divide into 40 cups. Add one cup to the boil every 3 min for 120 min)


Post Boil (Read Notes)
1 Pkgs American Ale (Wyeast Labs #1056) [Do a starter] – 3 DAYS PRIOR!

1 Pkgs Super High Gravity Ale (White Labs #WLP099) [Do a starter and pitch 5 days into fermentation]

15.5 lb Corn Sugar (Dextrose) - divided into 28 bags and added 2X daily once primary fermentation kicks off
1.5 oz Simcoe [12.00 %] (Dry Hop 21 days) Hops
2.0 oz Amarillo [9.50 %] (Dry Hop 21 days) Hops
1.5 oz Warrior [16.40 %] (Dry Hop 21 days) Hops
(mix hops and make 21 bags to dry hop 1X per day for 21 days)

If anyone needs the full recipe I can send that to you. Like I said. Came out damn close to dogfish 120 except at 4 weeks in it has a strong sweet corn sugar taste. Gravity readings were dead on but maybe I didn't need the last couple additions of corn sugar and they never fermented. Hoping that aging the beer takes away some of the sweetness. Guess nothing else I can do at this point.

Using the two yeast mentioned above I hit 21% ABV 2 weeks in. Much quicker than I had anticipated.


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Old 01-08-2013, 06:50 PM   #12
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Wow. That's really mostly all I have to say. I guess my only thought would have been to mix up the adjunct sugar additions instead of all corn sugar - maybe some cane and or brown sugar sometime in there, possibly some honey, etc. dunno that it would bring you closer or further from 120, but I'd think it would help avoid a specific corn sugar flavor.

Congrats in hitting FG on it.


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Old 01-09-2013, 09:29 PM   #13
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Can sugar and brown sugar additions would result in a slightly HIGHER finishing gravity; not the way to go if he's looking for a lower FG.

Great process, Soulshine; starting with a fairly normal highly alcohol tolerant strain for the beginning of the fermentation to avoid the nasty flavors of a pure WLP009 fermentation and feeding it the simple sugars a bit at a time later. 21% is a serious accomplishment.


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Old 01-09-2013, 10:05 PM   #14
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Thanks. Was first attempt at a monster ale like this so will make some adjustments next time. I am actually going to pitch some champagne yeast just to see if I can get any of those residual sugars and dry it out a bit. Can't hurt. Will let you know if there is any success with that.
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Old 01-10-2013, 12:43 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biertourist
Can sugar and brown sugar additions would result in a slightly HIGHER finishing gravity; not the way to go if he's looking for a lower FG.
Wasn't suggesting cane or brown sugar to lower gravity - I suggested it to avoid the corn sugar flavor - using it in place of some of the corn sugar, not in addition to. It would bring it to the SAME gravity as the corn sugar.

At any rate, champaign yeast should be able to get you a little farther, but 21% is probably pretty close to a good as you're going to get. Don't remember just how high ABV champaign yeast can tolerate, but I think you're already pretty close. 23% maybe?
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Old 01-10-2013, 05:57 PM   #16
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Read an article today that was saying to get high abc they actually brew beer then cool it down until water freezes, then keep doing that to get higher and higher abv. not sure how they would go about doing that, though I know alcohol doesn't freeze as fast as water. Maybe they let it naturally warm up after removing water to ferment more then freeze again, no idea.they got to 50% abv though, done other guy is coming out with a 65 abv.
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:34 PM   #17
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The process is, I believe, called eisening, and is used to make eisenbocks. And you must be referring to Brewdog. The thing about freezing out the water is that it makes flaws in the beer more pronounced. The more removed, the stronger the flaws... Those guys were using some specialized freezers to freeze the beer over and over again. And also more the cost... I don't recall how many barrels they started with for The End of History", but they only ended up with something like 8 bottles (12oz) after all the water reduction. It's expensive and usually probably results in awful beer when done repeatedly like they are... Won't speak for anybody else but I say no thanks...
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:42 PM   #18
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15 lbs of sugar and 18 lbs of extract? Can't say I've ever attempted a 20% abv beer, but I'm skeptical/curious about how this will turn out.


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