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Old 10-01-2012, 02:08 AM   #431
Qhrumphf
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Adding honey after fermentation is complete is a common practice for many brewers on here. It'll preserve the most flavor and aroma. I've always added it after flame-out (no boiling), allowing it a little bit between 180 and 200 degrees to pasteurize it.

I'm curious what you mean by "more" honey. Did you split the honey, adding some on brewday and some later? Are you adding additional honey? Or is this the only honey addition?

A friend and I brewed an all-grain adaptation of the Honey Ale a couple weeks ago. We'll be bottling in about 2 weeks. It's at his house, so I haven't gotten a chance to taste it yet. We were trying to keep as true to [the intent of] the original recipe as we could. Given that I live right across the river from the District, I was able to source some honey from hives less than a mile from the White House, so hopefully we're pretty close.


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Old 10-01-2012, 02:10 AM   #432
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No, you're reading it right. 3.5# of honey.Dont know why, it just seemed ..... Good. Anyways, I used a yeast cake from my previous beer (prior to blueberries) made from safale us 05. I made two starters from it and pitched both.

Now, before Revvy shows up and slaps me with some NOOB knowledge, I took another reading, and it was still at 1.000. The airlock has started to bubble on the secondary, but I don't want to let it just go to town and run the risk of autolysis. I am more than willing to admit that my initial reading was wrong.



 
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Old 10-01-2012, 02:20 AM   #433
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The only thing I'm thinking that could drop it THAT low is an infection (even 3711 won't go that low in my experience, even if it gets close), but I'd think it'd need longer than 2 weeks for an infection to drop it that far. I'd expect all that honey to dry the beer out a bit, maybe even make it a little vinous/cidery, but I don't think it'd do that much. My guess is that something's wrong with your hydrometer or it's user error.
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Souring: '14 Brett C Old Ale, '15 Lambic, '14 Lambic, '14 Flemish Red, '15 Flemish Pale, '15 Oud Bruin, '15 Session Kriek
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Cellar: '10 Brett B Tripel, '11 Lambic, '13 Brett C English Barleywine, '13 Quadrupel, '13 Sour Stout, '14 Brett C Bitter, '14 Spontaneously Fermented Cider, '15 Wee Heavy, '15 100% Brett B Red, '15 100% Brett L Kriek, '15 Bière de Garde

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Old 10-01-2012, 02:41 AM   #434
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I added about one lb of honey @ 10 minutes to cool down. I'm adding another 1 lb on Wednesday

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 02:42 AM   #435
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And yeah, I figured I'd go with a local twist since the recipe uses local honey. The honey I used is from a local apiary.

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 03:26 AM   #436
lawman67
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Big TYPO on my part! I could probably qualify for a job in the White House kitchen. My bad notes for sure, it was not 175 when I put the yeast in. Thank you guys for the catch on that. The recipe called for pitching when the wort was between 70-80 degrees, which I tried for the middle at 75 degrees. By evening, it was up to 78 (not 178) and just didn't seem to want to go down even with a 66 degree ambient temp in the basement. My primary has the adhesive strip thermometer stuck on the outside, so I'm trusting it to reasonably estimate the beer temp. I use a seperate digital thermometer for the ambient.
I'll be more aware on the next batch and get cooled a few more degrees to the bottom of the range before pitching. I've read quite a few posts that indicate this is not uncommon and it's good to know how to solve for it.
This one may be on the shelf for awhile and I'll just keep making notes to learn from.

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 03:32 AM   #437
lawman67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freisste View Post
The immediate bubbles were your yeast screaming in pain. I'm too new to know the effects of overheating yeast very well. I'm sure at some point, you kill the yeast. Don't worry (until someone else tells you to), I'm not saying your yeast is dead, I'm saying I don't know if it is dead. You will likely have some off flavors because the yeast was too hot.

Questions:
1 - You said it didn't get down to 78 for three days. How hot was it before that? Any idea how long it was above 100?

2 - You say things settled down after 2 days. What do you mean settled down? Stopped bubbling? Is that 2 days after it got down to 78 or two days after brewing?

Hopefully it bubbled after cooling down. Pretty much a guarantee that the yeast isn't dead. After that, I think you should be alright. Likely some extra or missing flavors from some problems with technique, but all learning experiences.
It was at 75 degrees when I pitched the yeast and by that same evening, the temp was up to 78 degrees (not the 68-72 I was looking for). The beer stayed at 78 degrees for 3 days in the basement where the room was at 66 degrees.
The bubbling settled down after 2 days instead of every couple of minutes to a couple of times per hour. I did not notice any bubbles during days 4 through 7.

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 03:43 AM   #438
lawman67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogarthe View Post
you added the yeast at 175? or did you mean 75? 175 would probably kill most if not all the yeast. 75 is on the warm side, but doable, if you can further cool it after pitching, which it sounds like you weren't able to. Fermenting at that temp probably will give you some off flavors. only time will tell if it will be completely ruined or not though. I don't secondary any more, but that is just me, other people do it all the time. whether you leave it in primary, secondary or in the bottles, I usually find giving the beer some extra aging time will help. especially if the temps get away from you. I made a porter where the temps got too high and the beer had a hot alcohol taste when I bottled it. I left it for about 6 months and now it tastes much better. I think your batch will most likely benefit from the same...
Thank you for the help. I decided to go with the secondary so I can free up the primary for a Vienna Lager kit that is on deck. I decided to taste it while transferring and it tastes like beer, though it has an alcohol bite to it for sure. This forum has been awesome for digging into and shortening the learning curve on the fundamentals.

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:04 AM   #439
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If you haven't checked the gravity I would advise against doing anything with it, especially if you haven't seen much activity. You should see a lot of action in the first 48 hours, if you didn't see much I would be concerned that you haven't achieved much fermentation. If you didn't get an OG it'll be hard to tell if the yeast have done anything. But 75 degrees should have been a safe temperature to pitch. My advice is to check the gravity against what the recipe says the FG should be and if it's too high let it sit in primary a bit longer and RDWHAH

 
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:22 AM   #440
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A Top Beer Sommelier Assesses Obama's Home-Brew Recipe
http://www.businessweek.com/articles...omebrew-recipe

White House Beer: A Brewer Weighs In
http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.c...wer-weighs-in/


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