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Old 09-12-2012, 06:21 PM   #341
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I've used 100% RAW honey without any issue at all. There's been times where it's taken a while to go post-lag phase, so IF anything was going to happen, it would have. I do practice normal sanitation when making mead or brewing beer. Using StarSan helps out a lot. I've also warmed up honey and poured it into the fermenter, on a beer, after a few weeks of it going (beer was about 9% on it's own) to help the batch out some. With the funnel sanitized, there was no issue at all.

I have batches of mead in process that the must was never heated above 100-110F (the honey had warmer water added to help it mix easier). No issues at all with those. Not heated to pasteurize it, or kill the honey.

Look in the Got Mead forums about how many people are making mead without heating the honey at all. Even people that have been making mead for a long time (and have books published about it, like Ken Schramm) are using this method. Those books that are still available, with outdated information, are not being updated because of the publishers, NOT the authors.

You cannot lump honey (even raw, just filtered honey) into the same group as other post-boil additions. You also need to have a different mentality when making mead compared with brewing beer. Very different processes/methods are used between them.

As for informing the WH... Not going to be done by me. They can do whatever they will (like brewing extract batches) for all I care. The posted recipes from them just shows how little they actually know about brewing. IMO, if anyone should be brewing all grain, it's the people there. Of course, they probably don't have a clue how to actually do it. I also think the entire release of their recipes was severely over-hyped to a sickening degree. Especially once you got to look at the recipes. IMO, nothing special about them at all.
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:23 PM   #342
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amandabab View Post
18lbs honey for a batch of mead, thats not getting boiled.
Try a bochet mead, honey boiled for 2 hours. Real good stuff.
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:28 PM   #343
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Im curious to try this. Would it make more sense to add the honey when you are cooling your wort to room temp? Say in the 100 to 110 range so that it still breaks down but not get rid of the honey flavor?
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Old 09-12-2012, 06:43 PM   #344
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Originally Posted by joyceman View Post
Try a bochet mead, honey boiled for 2 hours. Real good stuff.
that's a different thing all together, not so boiling as you are caramelizing for a long time at soft crack temps then burning it.
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Old 09-13-2012, 01:00 AM   #345
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Default White House recipe

WHITE HOUSE HONEY PORTER
Ingredients
2 (3.3 lb) cans light unhopped malt extract
3/4 lb Munich Malt (cracked)
1 lb crystal 20 malt (cracked)
6 oz black malt (cracked)
3 oz chocolate malt (cracked)
1 lb White House Honey
10 HBUs bittering hops
1/2 oz Hallertaur Aroma hops
1 pkg Nottingham dry yeast
3/4 cup corn sugar for bottling

Directions
1. In a 6 qt pot, add grains to 2.25 qts of 168˚ water. Mix well to bring temp down to 155˚. Steep on stovetop at 155˚ for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, bring 2 gallons of water to 165˚ in a 12 qt pot. Place strainer over, then pour and spoon all the grains and liquid in. Rinse with 2 gallons of 165˚ water. Let liquid drain through. Discard the grains and bring the liquid to a boil. Set aside.
2. Add the 2 cans of malt extract and honey into the pot. Stir well.
3. Boil for an hour. Add half of the bittering hops at the 15 minute mark, the other half at 30 minute mark, then the aroma hops at the 60 minute mark.
4. Set aside and let stand for 15 minutes.
5. Place 2 gallons of chilled water into the primary fermenter and add the hot wort into it. Top with more water to total 5 gallons if necessary. Place into an ice bath to cool down to 70-80˚.
6. Activate dry yeast in 1 cup of sterilized water at 75-90˚ for fifteen minutes. Pitch yeast into the fermenter. Fill airlock halfway with water. Ferment at room temp (64-68˚) for 3-4 days.
7. Siphon over to a secondary glass fermenter for another 4-7 days.
8. To bottle, make a priming syrup on the stove with 1 cup sterile water and 3/4 cup priming sugar, bring to a boil for five minutes. Pour the mixture into an empty bottling bucket. Siphon the beer from the fermenter over it. Distribute priming sugar evenly. Siphon into bottles and cap. Let sit for 1-2 weeks at 75˚.

WHITE HOUSE HONEY ALE
Ingredients
2 (3.3 lb) cans light malt extract
1 lb light dried malt extract
12 oz crushed amber crystal malt
8 oz Bisquit Malt
1 lb White House Honey
1 1/2 oz Kent Goldings Hop Pellets
1 1/2 oz Fuggles Hop pellets
2 tsp gypsum
1 pkg Windsor dry ale yeast
3/4 cup corn sugar for priming

Directions
1. In a 12 qt pot, steep the grains in a hop bag in 1 1/2 gallons of sterile water at 155 degrees for half an hour. Remove the grains.
2. Add the 2 cans of the malt extract and the dried extract and bring to a boil.
3. For the first flavoring, add the 1 1/2 oz Kent Goldings and 2 tsp of gypsum. Boil for 45 minutes.
4. For the second flavoring, add the 1/2 oz Fuggles hop pellets at the last minute of the boil.
5. Add the honey and boil for 5 more minutes.
6. Add 2 gallons chilled sterile water into the primary fermenter and add the hot wort into it. Top with more water to total 5 gallons. There is no need to strain.
7. Pitch yeast when wort temperature is between 70-80˚. Fill airlock halfway with water.
8. Ferment at 68-72˚ for about seven days.
9. Rack to a secondary fermenter after five days and ferment for 14 more days.
10. To bottle, dissolve the corn sugar into 2 pints of boiling water for 15 minutes. Pour the mixture into an empty bottling bucket. Siphon the beer from the fermenter over it. Distribute priming sugar evenly. Siphon into bottles and cap. Let sit for 2 to 3 weeks at 75˚.
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Old 09-13-2012, 04:54 AM   #346
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OK, so I brewed up a batch of the White House Honey Porter and thought I’d give a review:

Reason: Idiotic political remarks removed/against forum rules
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:48 PM   #347
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Brewed the extract version of the Honey Ale 3 days ago. OG was 1.062. Really vigorous fermentation the first 24 hours or so. Airlock bubbles stopped today, took a SG and it is 1.018. Nice golden color and tastes good. A bit of a slightly bitter aftertaste but I suspect that will go away with conditioning.

Plan to rack this to secondary mid-next week.
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Old 09-14-2012, 08:05 PM   #348
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Another thing, the porter recipe says 10 HBU's bittering hops and 1/2 oz Hallertaur... I know that to figure out how much hops to use to get to 10 HBU is just 10 / Alpha Acid = # Oz hops ... but, the question is... what kind of hops? Hallertaur if I was makin' a lager perhaps but, er... um... I realize there are many Porter styles but primarily the use of English hops like EKG or Fuggles come to mind... So the question is, which hops for bittering?
And of course I will convert this to all grain before attempting, just subbing English Pale Ale Malt or US two-row for the LME... and NOT boil the honey ;p
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Old 09-14-2012, 08:08 PM   #349
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsernst View Post
Im curious to try this. Would it make more sense to add the honey when you are cooling your wort to room temp? Say in the 100 to 110 range so that it still breaks down but not get rid of the honey flavor?
I'm gonna go with this method and at this temp myself...
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Old 09-14-2012, 08:22 PM   #350
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I'm gonna go with this method and at this temp myself...
I guess I'm repeating myself, but if you are using unpasteurized honey you should boil it briefly, say 5 minutes. Unpasteurized honey contains bacteria and wild yeast.

If it's storebought honey that you think has been pasteurized, just open the container and heat it in a pan of hot water until is is very fluid, then dump into your pot. Heating isn't necessary here except to get all that goodness out of it's container.

[edit]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
You cannot lump honey (even raw, just filtered honey) into the same group as other post-boil additions. You also need to have a different mentality when making mead compared with brewing beer. Very different processes/methods are used between them.
OK, I looked through my Designing Great Beers book and here's the exact quote (pg. 27). Ray Daniels probably knows beer, I'll bet he has a good reason for saying this (besides common sense, which is what I rely on most times).

Quote:
Whatever you do, don't add unpastuerized honey directly to your cool wort -- you will have problems if you do.
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