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Old 09-27-2012, 02:39 PM   #21
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I'm an Army vet, spent time in Afghanistan. Have to agree with Yooper on this one. I volunteered to do it, loved (almost) every minute of it, and still have pangs of regret for getting out. The Army was very good to me and I only have a couple of scars and near death experiences to complain about. Besides, I was an infantryman. I got paid doing what every boy dreams of: shooting guns, blowing stuff up, jumping out of airplanes, all that fun stuff. My best friends are those I served with. They are godfathers to my children and will carry me off to the grave one day. On balance, I think I came out ahead.

 
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:59 PM   #22
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This one is almost impossible to field without bringing politics into the matter, so I'm going to do some tapdancing.

If the new perks you are looking for are qualitative such as being allowed to park in handicapped spaces or perhaps a federal handgun carrying permit, thats one thing.

However, no matter how you would implement a "right" such as your example of a lower mortgage rate, what you are refering to is a federal social program or subsity. Mortgage companies are in the business of making money, and the revenue they would lose would either a) come out of tax dollars in the form of a subsidy or in the form of lost tax revenue (ie giving a veteran a tax credit towards his mortgage, resulting in lost tax revenue) b) a beaurocracy such as the VA would be forced to go into the mortgage business. Mortgage companies would lobby hard against being "forced" to provide home loans to veterans at lower rates and would argue that it is big government hindering private business. Mortgage companies AND a huge chunk of private citizens would rail against the creation of "yet another" beaurocracy. Any right or priviledge accorded to a veteran that can be quantified in dollars and cents would run into the same problems that social security and HUD do, and it wouldnt be pretty.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:28 PM   #23
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Fair enough then I will take a free carry permit. Make that happen cheesy

 
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:29 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyChopps
Fair enough then I will take a free carry permit. Make that happen cheesy
Damn auto correct Creamy

 
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Old 09-28-2012, 12:04 PM   #25
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Robert A. Heinlein put forth an interesting theory dealing with the difference between "civillians" and "citizens" in his book Starship Troopers. Here is a brief excerpt from the Wikipedia synopsis:

"The people of the Terran Federation are either "Citizens" or "Civilians". Everyone is born a "Civilian", and at age 18 every "Civilian" has the right to enroll for a minimal 2-year term of "Federal Service". In theory a completed term of Federal Service ensures a "Citizen" is willing to put the needs of the community before their own personal well-being. This is because Federal Service is tough and dangerous (by design). It can involve joining the military, being a human guinea pig, testing survival equipment, or manual labour. The Federation makes it quite easy to quit a term of service before completion (even during war-time), but once someone has quit they are never allowed to enroll again. This is to ensure that all volunteers are dedicated, whilst also discouraging people from leaving.

The Federation makes the opportunity of Federal Service open to everyone, able-bodied or not. A doctor giving a medical examination says "if you came in here in a wheelchair and blind in both eyes and were silly enough to insist on enrolling, they would find you something silly to match. Counting the fuzz on a caterpillar by touch, maybe." The only bar to Federal Service is a requirement for a psychiatrist to determine you can understand the oath.

"Civilians" are neither discriminated against, nor deprived of legal rights other than that of the ballot. Several examples from the book bear this out, particularly the fact that Juan Rico's family is prosperous and lacks for nothing save the right to vote (which Rico's father regards as "useless" anyway).

Only after completing a term of Federal Service can "Civilians" become "Citizens" and gain the right to vote."

Now that's just fiction & I'm not saying we should or shouldn't adopt it, I'm just saying that it's an interesting theory and seemed to have merit to this thread.
Regards, GF.

 
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:41 PM   #26
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Thanks for that reading material I agree it's a little far fetched but interesting none the less.

 
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:42 PM   #27
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I was actually thinking about ST when I first read this thread. On the surface, giving combat veterans a thank you gift of some sort seems like a no-brainer. However, what this could be, practically, is a different story.

One thing I support adamently is that those combat veterans who have been in high-stress situations during their tours (perhaps not the helicopter mechanic stateside or the quartermaster, which is not to diminish their service) receive mandatory therapy at the end of their tour. A cousin of mine who spent almost his entire adult life being shot at and on two occassions blown up in Afganistan and Iraq came home to a normal life. To cope with his traumas he turned to alcohol, and honestly, he was a legal liability. He'd cheated death so many times, what were the chances that the jealous husband could take him down at the bar or that a car crash would take him out? It wasnt until about 3 years into civilian life, and waking up in the drunk tank a few times, did he seek therapy and alcohol abuse counceling, which he had to pay for himself.

If the armed forces spend so much time and money on training you to be a military man, they should spend time and money retraining you to be a civilian.
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See, that's where the real story is.
In the competition for the attention of the space aliens.
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:42 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyChopps View Post
Just little things would be cool like lower mortgage rates and maybe some tax cuts just little perks. Like certain states offer little things for vets however I live in Ga which gets you a free driver license so whoppty do.
I got a VA home loan, reduction on my real estate taxes, the GI Bill that paid well above and beyond my college costs ultimately sending me on a few vacations, a full ride to state college for 2 semesters (still collected GI Bill), 3 extra vacation days at work every year that non-Vets don't get, various discounts and rebates on all kinds of things including the two Jeeps I purchased, and I'm sure I'm missing some.

The number one benefit is when people say thank you to me even though they don't have to, ever.

Why do we deserve anything special for our service? It defeats the purpose of being a quiet professional and we already get plenty anyway. Maybe you should look into Veteran's benefits offered by other states and move.
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:44 PM   #29
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And oh yeah, on a whole, infantry training doesnt translate well into civilian life. Would I support a plan to convert some of my tax dollars into a plan to give retiring veterans job training? Absolutely.
__________________
See, that's where the real story is.
In the competition for the attention of the space aliens.
Everyone's equal in the eyes of God, but the space aliens, you've got to figure they would play favorites.




YES, WE HAVE TRIED OTHER YEASTS! USE BREAD YEAST FOR JAOM!


 
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Old 09-28-2012, 01:54 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lumpher View Post
our training is considered sub-par, even though we control millions of dollars of eqpt. our leadership potential isn't considered, even though i supervised 14 guys at age 21 overseeing $35 million of eqpt, along with 31 missiles, many of them enough to start ww3
Right, but the people you commanded were trained by someone else, wearing equipment made by someone else, overseeing highly complicated equipment designed and built by someone else, all paid for by the people you are now demanding treat you "special."

I feel veterans are already fairly compensated and recognized for their admittedly substantial sacrifices.

It sounds to me like the OP is experiencing what a lot of military personnel report going through upon reintegrating into society. Specifically, after seeing such raw and horrific things, and operating as part of such a tight and cohesive unit, he perceives the rest of society as "soft" and unworthy. I personally have no experience with this, I'm only pointing it out to suggest that perhaps the OP would benefit from talking to a mental health professional before he does something impulsive.

 
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