Little confused on priming - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Little confused on priming

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-25-2012, 03:12 PM   #1
silverbullet07
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Roanoke, VA
Posts: 74
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts



Everyone seems to go with 1oz corn suger per gallon and when I look up the sugar rate on a priming calculator, it shows different co2 for different style beers.


I want to prime a German dunkelweizen and according to the chart I want between 3.3 4.5 volumes of co2.

Is the temperture at bottling what the beer temperture is at bottling or what the temperture will be during conditioning?

So if my German Wheat beer need 4 volumes co2 @ 68F it shows 8.4 oz sugar.

Everyone seems that is to much that is why I'm confused.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 03:28 PM   #2
beerman0001
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
virginia beach, virginia
Posts: 984
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts


The temp is what your beer temp is at the time of bottling. 3.5 is the most I would carb it to. 4.5 is going probably going to explode the bottles.


__________________
Fermenting.
On tap: World wide lager, Dopelbock, Apfelwein, American Wheat, DFH 90, Dortmunder export, Skeeterpee, Chinook/Citra ipa.
Waiting on a tap. Maibock, Two Hearted, Pliny the elder, Chimay White, Roggenbrier, DFH60
Fermenting:Apfelwein
On Deck:
Hiding in dark corner: Lambic, Flanders red, Oud Bruin, DFH 120(in bottles)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 03:39 PM   #3
Pie_Man
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,372
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


Yes, it's the temperature of your beer at bottling time. The current temperature affects the CO2 volume in solution.

I've had the best results following northern brewer's online priming calculator.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 04:31 PM   #4
billl
Recipes 
 
May 2012
Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,200
Liked 350 Times on 293 Posts


I disagree. If you ferment at 68 and then crash cool to 32 before bottling, I wouldn't be using 32 to calculate priming levels. It takes an extended period of time for gas to migrate back into solution with the minimal surface area in a fermenter. Gas comes out of solution very easily as temp rises but it isn't as quick or easy to get it dissolved back in.

It's the same reason why you can't just let your wort sit for a couple minutes and have it naturally saturate with oxygen. Its also the same reason you want to stick your brew in the fridge for a couple days before drinking (and that is with it being under pressure.)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 04:39 PM   #5
brycelarson
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 529
Liked 55 Times on 49 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
I disagree. If you ferment at 68 and then crash cool to 32 before bottling, I wouldn't be using 32 to calculate priming levels.
Right. You want to use the temperature that the beer has been held at for a long period of time previous to priming.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 05:05 PM   #6
Pie_Man
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,372
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


I still believe it's the temperature at bottling time that matters, not the temperature that the beer will be conditioned at which was the OP's orignal question.

Here's my process: After fermentation is complete, I crash cool my beer for several days at about 36-40 degrees in order to drop any sediment out of suspension. On bottling day, I remove the beer from my fridge, and place it on my kitchen counter with a towel under the carboy. I then let the beer warm up to about room temperature and bottle. I base my priming sugar calculation on the current temperature, which is now at or close to room temperature using northern brewer's calcuator, http://www.northernbrewer.com/priming-sugar-calculator/.

Running your priming sugar calculations at the temperature you crash cool at is not practical if you're bottling in your home as the beer will warm up fairly quickly during the process. This will lead to inconsitent carbontation levels since CO2 is released as the liquid warms up, as mentioned by the other posters.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 05:48 PM   #7
duboman
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Glenview, IL
Posts: 6,368
Liked 508 Times on 470 Posts


All beer has a residual amount of CO2 in suspension and it directly correlates to the temperature of the fermentation. An ale fermented at 65 will have a different amount then a lager fermented at 50.

The priming sugar calculation takes into account the fermentation temperature, not the temperature at the time if bottling. If you we're to take the two beers and allow to warm to the same temp at bottling and used the same calculation then one beer would be over carbonated and one would be less because they fermented at different temperatures.
__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 05:57 PM   #8
FuzzeWuzze
I Love DIY
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
FuzzeWuzze's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Newberg, Oregon
Posts: 3,079
Liked 411 Times on 305 Posts


I wouldnt try to bottle with that much sugar, you will blow...to get that high of a pressure you'd probably have to keg.

5oz per 5 gallons already is on the high side IMO....i wouldnt go much beyond that if at all.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 06:04 PM   #9
Pie_Man
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,372
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by duboman View Post
The priming sugar calculation takes into account the fermentation temperature, not the temperature at the time if bottling.
I guess that depends on the source of your priming sugar calculation. I've used several and I've had the best results using the NB calculator which asks for the current temperature of the beer as one of its inputs, not the fermentation temperature of the beer. The process I outlined above has worked well for me, but I'm sure there are other ways to get results. If I didn't crash cool, I'd probably go off the fermentation temperature for ales. Lagers might be a little trickier as they are typically lagered which would have similar affects to crash cooling. In that case, I'd probably warm the beer up to room temperature and go off the current temperature for bottling.

Also, a good debate on the topic here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/eff...-needs-134347/.


 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 06:15 PM   #10
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2006
UP of Michigan, Winter Texan
Posts: 69,010
Liked 7603 Times on 5351 Posts


It's NOT the temperature at bottling. It's "fermentation temperature" or the highest temperature the beer reached during or after fermentation.

Here's why- cold liquids "hold" onto co2 quite well. Co2 is produced during fermentation, but not after fermentation. Once the beer is done, no new co2 is being produced.

Say you ferment a beer at 65 degrees, then let it sit at room temperature of 74 degrees since your fermentation chamber was full. Then, put it in the kegerator to crash cool.

You should use 74 degrees, as the co2 would off-gas more at 74 degrees. And that is the reason the calculators use the temperature- they want to guestimate the probable amount of residual co2 already in the beer.

I hate those priming calculators, by the way! They do help you prime "to style". But in this case, you could easily have bottle bombs and most bottles probably would be able to handle 4+ volumes of co2. Plus, when you open that bottle, even if it didn't blow up, it would gush and foam something awful. And there is the confusion, as noted above, about what temperature to use!

I always recommend using .75-1 ounce of priming sugar, by weight, per gallon of finished beer. .75 ounce for a lower carbed beer (say, a stout), and 1 ounce for more highly carbed beers like pale ales and German style beers. They may not be precisely "to style", but bottled beer usually isn't! Most bottled beers are 2.3-2.6 volumes of co2, and that is what we are used to.


__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SG too low? :confused: joshso Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 07-08-2012 02:18 AM
Cane Sugar Priming Help - I'm very confused buffalojoe29 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 36 06-13-2012 07:56 PM
Very confused about bottle priming! Hangfire Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 07-09-2011 12:12 PM
Had bad luck with priming with DME. How to convert to priming sugar? agurkas Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 05-15-2011 06:14 PM
Confused smoke76 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 06-25-2007 02:54 PM


Forum Jump