Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Next partial mash beer?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-25-2012, 06:52 PM   #11
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 4,020
Liked 426 Times on 343 Posts
Likes Given: 72

Default

Not really...

Steeping grains like Cara/Crystal malts or other Dark malts are usually "steeped" for their sweet or robust flavor and color contributions. They have already been converted to sugar so they do not need to be mashed. Think of it like a tea bag in water.

Partial Mash beers contain unconverted grains, high in starch (which must be converted via a mash - which is nothing more than a very stringent/controlled steep that focuses on exact temps/times/ratios/etc). These grains include 2-row, wheat malt, munich, vienna, rye, oats, etc. They are not rich in caramel sweetness or very dark, raisiny, roasty.

A PM beer usually contains 50-60% Extract such as LME/DME (which is basically base malt that has already been converted). So a partial mash beer is approx. half grain that has not been converted (which needs to be) plus approx. half extract that is ready to use.


bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 07:43 PM   #12
JLem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,653
Liked 176 Times on 153 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kooklife
Ok so basically the main difference is that I gain control of the total percentage of what is steeped in all grain and in partial mash I only have a small percentage of control because of the dme or lme right?
Yes...except for that word "steeped"'in there. With all grain you are in complete control of the grains that go into making your beer and the temperature at which they get mashed (makes a difference). Whenever you use extract, you relinquish at least some control to the extract manufacturer on both accounts.


__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 07:46 PM   #13
JLem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Attleboro, MA
Posts: 3,653
Liked 176 Times on 153 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews
Not really...

Steeping grains like Cara/Crystal malts or other Dark malts are usually "steeped" for their sweet or robust flavor and color contributions. They have already been converted to sugar so they do not need to be mashed. Think of it like a tea bag in water.

Partial Mash beers contain unconverted grains, high in starch (which must be converted via a mash - which is nothing more than a very stringent/controlled steep that focuses on exact temps/times/ratios/etc). These grains include 2-row, wheat malt, munich, vienna, rye, oats, etc. They are not rich in caramel sweetness or very dark, raisiny, roasty.

A PM beer usually contains 50-60% Extract such as LME/DME (which is basically base malt that has already been converted). So a partial mash beer is approx. half grain that has not been converted (which needs to be) plus approx. half extract that is ready to use.
But there's no need to keep those specialty grains out of the mash. Even though they do not need to be converted and can be steeped, you can add them to the mash (either full or partial). Their color, flavors, and sugars will be extracted just the same (perhaps better given the tighter control a mash is usually under). Mashing everything together obviates the need for an extra steeping step.
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar
JLem is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 02:58 PM   #14
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 4,020
Liked 426 Times on 343 Posts
Likes Given: 72

Default

I used to think that too...

I was reading "Brewing: Science and Practice" awhile back, which is an insanely expensive and extensive encyclopedia of advanced brewing techniques. In it, they mentioned that mashing converted grains with uncoverted grains causes a decrease in efficiency. They showed a bunch of experiments which supported their findings, but didn't go into much detail as to explain "why" this was the case. I always believed it did not matter in the past. But I currently divide my mashing grains from my steeping grains, and mash/steep them separately. Not a big deal for me since I use dual kettles anyway.

http://www.amazon.com/Brewing-Practi.../dp/0849325471
bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools



Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS