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Old 09-25-2012, 05:18 PM   #11
gdwolfe273
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Feb 2012
Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bja

I usually ferment between 60-62 and rarely have an out of control fermentation. Though it has happened. IMO 70 is way too high.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bja

I usually ferment between 60-62 and rarely have an out of control fermentation. Though it has happened. IMO 70 is way too high.
No dedicated fermentation fridge available, using evaporation technique to keep as low as possible (set fermenter in oil pan, put water in oil pan, tshirt over fermenter to soak up water, and try to have a fan blowing on it). Plus it is cool at night right now so I leave the windows open. But short of cranking the A/C down to 60 degrees (which isn't very feasible) I don't think I will be getting it that low. I have fermented almost all my other beers at that same temp and usually don't have as vigorous of fermentation going on. I always make sure i stay within recommended fermentation temps per the yeast manufacturer http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/HB/E...e_US-05_HB.pdf Part of it (as mentioned above) is that I filled the fermenter up too much, but not much I can do about that at this point. I have a good idea about why it is happening. Mostly wanted to see what was recommended with the blow off tube and growler with star san solution in it.



 
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Old 09-25-2012, 05:19 PM   #12
gdwolfe273
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Feb 2012
Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSounds

Party on Wayne

Leave it - It'll be fine. Maybe change the growler water
Haha. Will do once it slows down a little. Thanks! Party on Garth!



 
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Old 09-25-2012, 05:31 PM   #13
SweetSounds
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Jan 2010
Des Moines, Iowa
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The temperature is fine. According to Fermentis US-05 is happy from 59 to 75 degrees.
It's just REALLY happy yeast! Let them eat cake

http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/IB/E...e_US-05_IB.pdf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecnerwal View Post
What does the primary pressure gauge on the tank tell us? That's right, the temperature. Put it on a scale if you want to know how much is in it...
Put some duct tape over the gauge - Or better yet - Replace the high pressure gauge with a plug - High pressure gauges are useless!

 
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Old 09-25-2012, 06:01 PM   #14
bja
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Nov 2007
Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSounds View Post
The temperature is fine. According to Fermentis US-05 is happy from 59 to 75 degrees.
It's just REALLY happy yeast! Let them eat cake

http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/IB/E...e_US-05_IB.pdf
All yeast is happy when warm, the problem is they make better beer when they're at the lower end of that range.
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I know it just wouldn't be right to kill all the stupid people that we meet, but do you think it would be appropriate to just remove all of the warning labels and let nature take its course?

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 02:10 AM   #15
gdwolfe273
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Feb 2012
Raleigh, NC
Posts: 45
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Decided to quickly swap out growler with a new one with fresh star san solution in it...but didn't touch the blow off hose yet. In another couple days if fermentation has slowed down I will swap it out with a fresh airlock and clean out the hose in some PBW. I set up the fan to try and keep the temp as low as possible to slow things down just a little bit and now crossing my fingers and hoping for the best. For the love of pumpkin beers, please keep your fingers crossed with me. Thank you!

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 02:16 AM   #16
xmacro
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Sep 2012
Tampa, FL
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You could always go down to your LHBS and buy a fermometer for a couple bucks - nifty little things to have, just slap it on your fermenter and you know what tempt the yeast are at inside

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:08 AM   #17
gdwolfe273
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Feb 2012
Raleigh, NC
Posts: 45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xmacro
You could always go down to your LHBS and buy a fermometer for a couple bucks - nifty little things to have, just slap it on your fermenter and you know what tempt the yeast are at inside
Already got it on there. That's how I was able to quote the temps earlier. By the time I got home from work the temp did go up a little (I'm guessing mostly due to the heat given off during very very active fermentation since the house temp didn't really go up). So I shoved the fan on it to bring it back down and keep it cool.

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:23 AM   #18
AndrewD
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Aug 2012
Santa Rosa, CA
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I've had a few fermentations like that. I've never changed out the blowoff tube. I just secondaried one today. Luckily, I had the better bottle in a big tub with the blowoff reservoir in there as well. I put the better bottle cardboard box over the top of the carboy and that contained a nasty yeast spurt when the bung popped out (luckily I heard it pop and quickly secured it back in there with sanitized foil and a rubber band). I did have a scary moment when I was securing the bung back in there. The turbo stream of CO2 completely stopped and I thought that I had created a gap between the hose and the bun. I sprayed starsan all over the whole thing to look for bubbles, but everything seemed airtight. After about 2 minutes of puzzled staring, I heard the BB actually groan and then saw a big plug of trub sliding through the tube. After a huge hippo fart, all was well again. There was about 1/8" of yeast/sanitizer overflow in the tub and there was dried trub all over the BB, the hose, and the reservoir. The one thing I don't like about the BB is that my old big bore blowoff assembly doesn't fit (yet). Part of me thinks that theoretically, once positive pressure inside the fermenter is gone, then nasties could propagate up the blowoff tube and into the beer due to the trub lining on the tube and in the top of the fermenter. But by then the alcohol is up and the sugars are down, and I am really lazy, so I never worry about it.

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 12:35 PM   #19
Zacher
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Aug 2011
Phoenixville, PA
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RDWHAHB! That's a great sign that your yeasties are doing their job and doing it well. Leave it be until it's done, or slap on a sanitized airlock after the vigorouus fermentation subsides.

 
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Old 09-26-2012, 12:41 PM   #20
krenshaw
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Dec 2010
Lancaster, PA
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hey OP, what kind of fermenter is that?


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