Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Hop combination, too much???
Thread Tools
Old 09-25-2012, 07:13 PM   #11
lupulin shift victim
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
chickypad's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: SF Peninsula
Posts: 4,195
Liked 626 Times on 518 Posts
Likes Given: 262


Originally Posted by duffstuff View Post
I just steep these for 30 mins before the boil. I didn't realize it would sweeten it up. Any advice on how to change it a bit ? For a hoppy beer. Thanks a million .
Caramel/cyrstal malts will give you some sweetness that may range from lighter caramel to dark and raisiny, see this.

For pale ales/IPA's I personally wouldn't go over 10% (actually I usually go around 5%). Dropping the caramel to 500g or less would get you in that range. If you want you could bump the DME just a bit to compensate, depending on what you are shooting for as far as OG.
Another option is to throw in 0.5-1 kg of pale malt and do a partial mash. It's really not that much harder than steeping, and Munich should really be mashed anyway. Lots of info on the forum about easy partail mash techniques.

chickypad is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 08:34 PM   #12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 1,028
Liked 48 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 6


Originally Posted by johngaltsmotor View Post
I wouldn't say the hops in the mid-range are wasted. Dogfish 60 or 90 (or even 120 if you're state allows it :-p) are all continuously hopped and the flavor profile that develops is definitely different than what you can get using only early and late additions.

Granted, I've never done a 1:1 comparison with homebrew, but I have to believe it all depends how complex of a flavor you're looking for.
I said kind of a waste. I agree it does something different by adding hops between 60m and 15m. I just don't do it. I don't poo poo the idea but generally advise against it.

I have read of some people who will only add hops at 60m and 1m or later with a dryhop.

This is what I read.

My outlook on 30-minute additions is similar to yours in that I don't think they hurt anything, but they can be wasteful. When I want the hops to shine, I'll use the three additions I mentioned earlier (or, in the case of something like a Pilsner, I'd skip the dry hops). For malty lagers, I may only do two additions: start of boil and 10-20 minutes from the end. For beers with fruits or spices, I'll often use only one addition at the start of the boil.

Hop oils are very volatile and easily driven out of wort by boiling, i.e. the escaping steam helps push them into the air, which is why whirlpool additions are a good way to extract them. I'd wager that increasing the boil time does things like this (I'm not claiming these specific things happen at the stated times, but I think it illustrates the general concept pretty well):

-Whirlpool additions retain all but the smallest oil molecules (small molecules are more volatile than large ones).
-A 10-minute addition is like a whirlpool addition but it also drives off medium-sized oil molecules.
-A 20-minute addition is like a 10-minute addition but it also drives off large oil molecules.
-A 30-minute addition is like a 20-minute addition but it also drives off small oxidized oil molecules (oxidized oils, some of which provide nice flavors, are less volatile than non-oxidized oils).

Where I'm going with this is that mid-boil additions can help you select specific flavor profiles. For example, a small 20-minute addition can impart a subtle noble hop character to a malty lager. If you were to move those hops to the whirlpool, the extra oils would overwhelm the desirable flavors and throw the beer out of balance.
In another link he talked about focusing more on essential oils instead of alpha acid levels.

logan3825 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2012, 08:47 PM   #13
struggling author
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
unionrdr's Avatar
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Sheffield, Ohio
Posts: 35,646
Liked 3108 Times on 2675 Posts
Likes Given: 2217


I'm thinking that's the reason why original species of hops taste better. The essencial oils are higher to that end. Have to look at that.
My sci-fi & home brewing books on amazon-kindle now! New additions coming!
NEW, REVISED EDITION of book one of Time Lords 2034 series now on Amazon Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NTA0L6G
My homebrewing book "Tippy Tippy Tappy" on Kindle! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00PBAP6JO
unionrdr is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 04:13 AM   #14
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Boston, massachusettes
Posts: 755
Liked 27 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 8


Originally Posted by duffstuff View Post
I had to google 86 it haha. You think it is wasted at 45??
lol sorry about that. also, i think you got your answer. Google "Hop bursting" it has done me wounders on my ipa's. cheers!
basilchef is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2012, 10:10 AM   #15
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 51

Thanks a million for all the input, once again I have learned more than I thought I would . Really appreciated ..cheers.

duffstuff is offline
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools

Forum Jump

Newest Threads