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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > When this will end?
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:05 PM   #1
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Hi guys/girls:

I started been interested in craft beers a few years ago and this year I started brewing, (all grain all the way from batch n1).
Since I started brewing I have tried to bring more and more control to my process and Im actually seeing a lot of improvment in my results (thanks HBT).
First was all grain just playing with my equipment and mill but not controlling fermentations temps and using dry yeast, when the summer started I make my ferm chamber (an old fridge actually), started using liquid yeast, making starters and pitching the correct amount of yeast.
Then I started washing yeast and harvesting yeast from comercial brews, now Im about to start my yeast bank and kegging, on christimas Ill have my RO system and I have started reading a lot about water chemestry.
I brew every week sometimes twice a week, and every time that I look there is something else I can do to improve my beer and everyday.
My question is: Will it be someday when I learn enough to loose interested in brewing? Doesnt seem probable to me at the moment but my "learning curve" its not far away from its peak.
I know there is a ton of info and things to learn and that I will never know it all but I also know that I have limitations. What you more expeirienced brewers think?


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Old 09-21-2012, 04:10 PM   #2
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I think there's always something to new to learn in brewing. Speaking in general terms, what you say about the learning curve and peaking out in a learning curve can happen in any activity/hobby. In other activities it seems like it's just when you think you know everything about it that suddenly you break through and learn something else or think of it a different way and you realize you have actually just brushed the surface. The riskiest part in the learning curve then in my opinion is when you think you have learned it all. Yes that can make your interest in the activity decrease if you're that kind of person, but it also makes it hard to continue learning when you think you've already learned it all because your mind closes to alternative techniques and information that might conflict with what you already believe to be true.


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Old 09-21-2012, 04:15 PM   #3
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You are rigth I think the most important thing its try to be humble all the time specially when you enjoy something so much that you cant be objective about it. For instance Ive found a lot of brewers that sure to God that their brews are great and they just feel like ok brews to me... that made me thing that even if I feel that I have brew something great there is big chance that its my heart speaking and not my brain, just like having kids and thinking highly of them even knowing that they are just average.
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:17 PM   #4
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I haven't reached a point of boredom yet, or learned enough to lose interest. Just when I feel sort of comfortable with a process, something new challenges me. I've been getting into water chemistry, and I could always try yeast ranching. I'm a beginner in many areas, like triple decoction mashing, yeast ranching, and water chemistry, and there are many more areas that I haven't even begun to scratch the surface yet.
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:21 PM   #5
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Not only do I continue to learn new things after 10 or so years of homebrewing, but sometimes things you think you know get challenged, brewing myths debunked, and new ideas born. It's an always evolving hobby on both the artistic and scientific frontiers. All I really know is there's still always a lot left to learn!
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:23 PM   #6
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Thanks for the replies guys/girls I really love beer and brewing more than anything else I had love in my entire life and just the idea of getting tired of this some day breaks my heart.
Ive even learn english to be able to read some books (there is very little info in spanish) Ive started brewing this year but Ive been reading for a loooonggg time(and saving money to get my equipment).
Your answers have brougth peace to my heart
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:07 PM   #7
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Homebrewing keeps changing, so there are always new yeasts, new specialty grains and new "hot" styles to try.

Maybe you can translate some of the more popular books. Might be some coin in it.
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
Maybe you can translate some of the more popular books. Might be some coin in it.
Yeah, so far Im translating parts of books for friends, but my english is not good enough for "formal" translations. I yet have to take my first english class. Self teach all the way.
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:15 PM   #9
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I can see some people getting bored with it after a while. People who don't care to push their personal limits, or people who just move on to the next thing.

But Homebrewing is like art. If you love it, then you do it just to see what you can create. There are finite possibilities, but they are so vast as to be practically limitless. Tastes evolve and new equipment, ingredients and techniques pop up now and again to help keep things fresh.

I wish I could brew more often, but I am the only one in my house drinking beer and I don't have the time right now to brew as often as I wish. So I spend my limited free time in building an upgraded system unless I am in need to more beer and someday I will change my process to fit my equipment and make brewing easier and hopefully more consistent, which makes creating better beer easier.

I can see this hobby lasting for many years to come, but at some point I'll more or less just be brewing and focusing more of my time on other hobbies, rather than spending it in equipment upgrades and learning.
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:17 PM   #10
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FYI, I just now noticed that you are not an natural English speaker. Your English is very good. Probably better than some Americans on this forum!


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