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Old 09-21-2012, 11:15 AM   #1
jvend
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Default Cooling wort by itself

Hi, after boiling I placed hot wort in the carboy and cool it with adding water from a hose on the outside. I waited until I could touched it and felt warm, once donde add yeast and let it there. Will flavor be bad because it cooled slowly on the final part?
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Old 09-21-2012, 11:29 AM   #2
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The real risk from letting your wort to cool slowly is that you run the risk of exposing the wort to bacteria, wild yeasts and other possible infection sources. This happens naturally and the goal is to give your preferred strains of yeast (ale/lager yeast) a foothold and a majority run at the wort before anything else gets into the wort. Many people use an ice bath, where you take your brew pot and immerse your wort into a large bath (in the kitchen sink or some sort of ice tub) of ice and cold water to bring down the temperature. Another method is to use an immersion chiller, which is placing a length of coiled copper tubing into your wort and running cold water through it to bring down the temperature. There are also other chillers that you can use such as plate chillers, etc..

As to whether you've screwed anything up, there's no need to panic at this point. Relax and check on your beer from time to time.
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Old 09-21-2012, 11:41 AM   #3
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Also, I'd check the temperature of the wort before you pitch yeast in the future. If it's warm to the touch, your pitching temps could easily be in the 80s, which is pretty high and can lead to some funky off flavors.

Along the lines of what aiptasia said, I'd look around for an immersion chiller. You can usually find one for about $45 and it's well worth it. Depending on your ground water temp (and the time of the year), you can bring wort temps down to pitching levels in 15-20 minutes, and it makes for a much smoother brew day. Many people do this method along with an ice bath to speed things up.

I'm sure your beer will be fine though.
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:15 PM   #4
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>>Hi, after boiling I placed hot wort in the carboy

You are lucky it didn't crack. Next time add the cold water before moving the wort to the carboy.
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:20 PM   #5
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Don't learn the hard way, pitching hot and fermenting warm is a recipe for disaster.........
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:26 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcLight View Post
>>Hi, after boiling I placed hot wort in the carboy

You are lucky it didn't crack. Next time add the cold water before moving the wort to the carboy.
It'll crack that way too, more than likely.

You're very lucky you didn't shatter a glass carboy and get hurt. Never add boiling wort to glass, ever. It's dangerous.

If you can't cool your wort before placing it in a fermenter (an ice bath works great), then at least look into "no chill brewing" and buy a plastic fermenter that won't crack and hurt you when you put boiling wort in it.
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:36 PM   #7
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Definitely rethink this plan before your next brew. Your current procedure is dangerous and unlikely to produce consistently good beer.

The wort should be cooled to fermenting temps, not "warm". Use a thermometer and wait for it to drop below 70. Most yeasts do not like warm temps and will tend to produce all sorts of off flavors.

Also, the garden hose is not an appropriate way to add topoff water. Once you stop the boil, you want everything that touches the wort to be sanitized. Your beer might turn out perfectly fine this time, but if you are lax with sanitation routines, you'll eventually run into problems.
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Old 09-21-2012, 02:33 PM   #8
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I drop my immersion cooler into the brew pot, which gets the wort to about 95F. Then transfer to the plastic fermenter, drop into the ferm chamber and set the dial to fermentation temps. When the fridge stops running I'm ready to aerate and pitch. The bucket has a lid and airlock so the uninnoculated wort is somewhat protected.
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:59 PM   #9
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so, in conclusion, the yeasty odor I felt yesterday could have been.because of yeast added been too hot? I added more yeast the next day, will it be fixed or is already spoiled? its only been 3 days of brewing, is it spoiled? in the past, everytime I felt that odor.at the first days at the end it was always spoiled beer. please tell me!
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Old 09-21-2012, 06:03 PM   #10
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Most people have added some very sound advise but a few points I really wanted to bring up again...

I would recommend NOT topping off your boiled wort with water from a garden hose. You pretty much are negating your boiling process. You want evertying from the boil on that comes in contact with your wort to be sterile. You should have an appropriate size boil kettle with the appropriate amount of water in before hand that will result in the boil bringing you down to the correct 5-5.5 gallon batch size. If you do not want to "build" or buy a chiller, as stated above ice baths work well, but you need to do this in a plastic container.

Please do not pour into a glass carboy for your own safety. I typically put my wort chiller in the boil kettle for the last 10 mins of the boil to sterilize it (this is after I have already cleaned it from the last brew.) From there I just hook the hose up and let it run for 10 -15 mins. That usually gets the temps down to a very reasonable range. Then pour into your plastic fermenter, or glass, if that is all you have. Just do not pour boiled water into a carboy.
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