The new style - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > The new style

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-20-2012, 12:48 AM   #1
Whippy
 
Whippy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Irmo, South Carolina, USA
Posts: 602
Liked 32 Times on 28 Posts



What new beer styles do you think we will see in the next decade, or what new styles would you LIKE to see recognized by the BJCP or the BA or whatever?

My pick for "like to see" would be an American Brown Porter...earthy American hops (Willamette, etc.) and higher alcohol than the traditional

What I think we will see would be the Black IPA (please forgive the contradiction in terms) and the red hoppy beers
__________________
Two weeks to ferment, two more in the kegs
but in just one night it was drained to the dregs

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 12:51 AM   #2
Cranny04
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Culpeper, Va
Posts: 411
Liked 21 Times on 18 Posts


American Bitters... Higher IBU's with citrusy American hops, low OG...
__________________
My Blog: Bros Beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 12:54 AM   #3
Waynep005
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Rancho Cordova, CA
Posts: 529
Liked 39 Times on 31 Posts


I think a hoppy wheat either a Wheat pale ale or wheat IPA or both.
__________________
"Stupid Should Hurt"

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 12:56 AM   #4
BrewWhat
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Tennessee
Posts: 64
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


New World IPA. A Malty English base and Yeast, with plentiful American Hops.
__________________
Beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 02:30 PM   #5
stjackson
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Columbus, GA
Posts: 146
Liked 19 Times on 12 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by cranny04 View Post
american bitters... Higher ibu's with citrusy american hops, low og...
+1

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 05:09 PM   #6
ludomonster
Recipes 
 
Feb 2012
berlin, nj
Posts: 507
Liked 33 Times on 29 Posts


I don't think we'll see an American Bitter style. The English Bitter is bitter only in name. It's largely a marketing term to make the beer seem more manly and to distinguish it from milds. Bitters and Pale Ales are almost identical. The only differences come from English yeast and American hops. Aside from light American lagers, there aren't many commercial examples of small American beers.

We will probably see the BJCP catch up to the AHA in styles to some degree, bringing in imperial reds as well as a few others. Rye and Black IPA's might make it in, as these are commercially popular. As more brewers sell these beers, we will probably see them define the styles. Each style will need an appropriate range in a number of variables, both qualitative and quanitiative. For a style to emerge, we would have to have many similar beers that are distinct from existing styles.
__________________
Bottled: Old Freckled Men, Berlin Mart Cider, Creamer Ale II
English Mother****er, Do You Drink It Pale Ale
C4 Pale Ale (Centennial, Challenger, Cascade, Citra hopburst)

Gone: Honeybadger Wheat Ale, Bad Amba Jamma, Badder Amba Jamma, Slam Dunkelweizen, Creamer Ale I, Robust Porter

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 05:14 PM   #7
BoomerHarley
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
oakland, ca
Posts: 212
Liked 64 Times on 41 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewWhat View Post
New World IPA. A Malty English base and Yeast, with plentiful American Hops.
You mean like Category 14B?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 05:21 PM   #8
Cranny04
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Culpeper, Va
Posts: 411
Liked 21 Times on 18 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ludomonster
I don't think we'll see an American Bitter style. The English Bitter is bitter only in name. It's largely a marketing term to make the beer seem more manly and to distinguish it from milds. Bitters and Pale Ales are almost identical. The only differences come from English yeast and American hops. Aside from light American lagers, there aren't many commercial examples of small American beers.

We will probably see the BJCP catch up to the AHA in styles to some degree, bringing in imperial reds as well as a few others. Rye and Black IPA's might make it in, as these are commercially popular. As more brewers sell these beers, we will probably see them define the styles. Each style will need an appropriate range in a number of variables, both qualitative and quanitiative. For a style to emerge, we would have to have many similar beers that are distinct from existing styles.
I think there are several examples for an "American" bitter. Most of them are not being distributed but they can be found at small breweries and brew pubs all over.

21A Bitter American (in the can its 4.4 ABV at the pub it was some where in the 3% range)


I make a 3.25 ABV ~ 37 IBU beer that is great.
__________________
My Blog: Bros Beer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2012, 05:25 PM   #9
Eliterunner1
 
Eliterunner1's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2012
Posts: 152
Liked 12 Times on 5 Posts


and Surly Bitter Brewer

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What sets Belgian style beers apart from every other style? Butcher General Beer Discussion 30 10-31-2014 09:00 AM
What Style Do I Have Here? HopSong General Beer Discussion 4 01-23-2012 06:13 PM
What style does this fit under gclay General Beer Discussion 5 05-04-2011 09:32 PM
What style is it? RevFry General Beer Discussion 4 04-27-2011 06:52 PM
Is there a style you can say you do not like? Ryan_PA General Beer Discussion 78 11-13-2007 04:27 PM


Forum Jump