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Old 09-19-2012, 10:09 PM   #1
samuel
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Jul 2012
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Can fermentation occur allright at 84 degrees with fruit juce that doesnt contain anything of grapes? Will It turn into fruit juice wine?

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 10:41 PM   #2
Unferth
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Aug 2012
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Yep, that ain't too high to kill the yeast all things else being normal. It very likely will have some funkiness to it. The yeast will work but they will be pissy about their conditions and your wine will be funky.

Some folks, at least with beer, intentionally raise the temperature to get different flavors, but it is risky and they generally are able to control factors better.

There is some great info on these forums about controlling your temps, even if you don't have access to things like a cellar or air conditioning like me.

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 11:05 PM   #3
samuel
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Jul 2012
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I dont have either also. The other option that i have is placing it in a wine cooler which its highest temp. is 65? Which will be better?

 
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Old 09-19-2012, 11:29 PM   #4
Unferth
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Aug 2012
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Those wine cooler things are the stuff for storage... I'm not sure how well they are ventilated though. Assuming that the gas spewing airlock won't f up your cooler, I don't see a problem. Anybody else?

You should look at the packet too. The Lalvin K strain and the EC1118 strain both say optimal fermentation for them is between 70 and 75. 5 degrees cooler will work, but will take slightly longer and may have a different profile.

 
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Old 09-20-2012, 01:55 AM   #5
saramc
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Agree with unferth...you need to check the temperature range for the yeast you are using. There are many temperature variables. Typically a slow, cool ferment helps maintain fruity aspects, etc.
If you need to cool your ferment down you can place container in a slighly larger container that comes up at least 75% of the way in height, pack ice and a splash of water around your bucket/carboy. May have to refresh daily but it works. And monitor temperature. Think back to old fashioned ice cream making, packing salt and ice, etc.
I will be modifying our side by side refrig/freezer as soon as we get our new one. Will be able to control temp for cool ferment, cold stabilization and heat treating.
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Old 09-20-2012, 02:06 AM   #6
samuel
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Jul 2012
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So does the fridge or cooler wont be damaged by the escaping co2? Thanks for the info about the cool fermentation!

 
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Old 09-20-2012, 03:42 PM   #7
Unferth
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Aug 2012
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I guess you could do a coalmine canary test on the wine cooler to make sure... Any canaries laying around? Haha. But seriously I think it'd be fine to use the cooler, it has to let out air. Just watch it close.

 
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:29 AM   #8
jagec
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Nov 2010
Baltimore, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samuel View Post
So does the fridge or cooler wont be damaged by the escaping co2? Thanks for the info about the cool fermentation!
The equipment certainly won't be damaged. The worst that could happen is that the yeast wouldn't get enough O2 and the wine wouldn't turn out.

 
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:47 AM   #9
samuel
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Jul 2012
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Thanks, ok but anyways wont get any o2 because of the airlock.

 
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Old 09-21-2012, 02:41 PM   #10
jagec
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Nov 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samuel View Post
Thanks, ok but anyways wont get any o2 because of the airlock.
If you're airlocking your primary, then sure, that won't be an issue. If the CO2 builds up enough it might "puff" past the door seals, but they should close back up on their own. Of course, you'll probably be opening the door every day to check on it anyway.

 
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