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Old 09-18-2012, 06:44 PM   #1
jesseroberge
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Aug 2012
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Can you guys tell me what is the difference between mash in and mash in mash out please...

There are alot of recipies that call for a mash in mash out, I never do mash out... Is this bad ?

The reason that I don't do mash out's is that my prefered batch is 6.08 gallons and my mash tun is 5 gallons so I don't have the tun space...

 
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:46 PM   #2
EvilDeadAsh
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A mash out is to raise the temperature of your mash to ~170 degrees F to stop conversion from going any further. It is useful in fly sparging, but generally not needed with batch sparging. As far as I know, the jury is out as to whether or not a mash out improves efficiency - I'm sure others will correct me if I am wrong

 
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:52 PM   #3
jesseroberge
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So it eon't change the outcome of the final product very much, it's not an absolute

 
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:56 PM   #4
billl
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"The reason that I don't do mash out's is that my prefered batch is 6.08 gallons and my mash tun is 5 gallons so I don't have the tun space..."

Well, if you don't have the space, you don't have the space. Not much you can do about that. We're only talking about a minor increase in efficiency for most people anyway.

 
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:05 PM   #5
Golddiggie
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You want to increase the mash temp to 168-172 after the mash is complete (after the time at mash temperature) in order to stop the conversion (as already stated) and then give the grain a rinse/sparge. If you're using a cooler mash tun, that can be difficult, depending on your method. You could heat/boil part of the mash and then add it back to increase the temp. Or add water at a higher temp to increase the mash to 168-172F. Personally, I simply heat the mash tun (a converted keg) to get the grain bed up to sparge temperatures. Then I simply run out the mash wort (or first wort) while adding the sparge water (already at the right temperature, from another kettle) to sparge.

Personally, I get better mash efficiency this way.

For the record, I have used cooler mash tuns before, but found them troublesome. I'm much happier being able to direct fire the mash tun to maintain it's temperature. You can also run the wort from the mash tun, through a HERMS/RIMS system (coil in another kettle with water at the desired temperature) to increase/regulate the mash temp.

I wouldn't use a 5 gallon mash tun for 5+ gallon batch sizes. You're seriously limited for what you can mash that way. IMO/IME, better off having at least a 10 gallon mash tun so that you're able to brew bigger beers when you want (without resorting to adding a bunch of [more expensive] DME).
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Old 09-18-2012, 07:11 PM   #6
jesseroberge
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Thanks for the info dudes

 
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