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Old 09-17-2012, 07:43 PM   #1
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Default Mashing at high temps question

Curious if mashing grains at high temps (grist temp > 170F) extract only nonfermentable sugars or both fermentable and nonfermentable.

Thanks for replies.


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Old 09-17-2012, 07:44 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrubHead
Curious if mashing grains at high temps (grist temp > 170F) extract only nonfermentable sugars or both fermentable and nonfermentable.

Thanks for replies.
You'll still get some fermentables, as well as tannins


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Old 09-17-2012, 07:50 PM   #3
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You'll still get some fermentables, as well as tannins
Thanks. Any idea on the percentages of fermentables & nonfermentables?
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Old 09-17-2012, 07:55 PM   #4
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I'm not an expert, but my guess is you'd have unmodified starches.
You would be doing a mash-out before you even started mashing. The amalayse would denature, and leave you with just wet grain.
Probably not a good idea.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:16 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Nohup View Post
I'm not an expert, but my guess is you'd have unmodified starches.
You would be doing a mash-out before you even started mashing. The amalayse would denature, and leave you with just wet grain.
Probably not a good idea.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
I was thinking this could be the case. So maybe temps between 70C - 75C are "habitable" for only the alpha enzymes (nonfermentables). Still curious about the ferm/nonferm percentages.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:34 PM   #6
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It could be an interesting experiment. I know I one time mashed a big wheat at 160 - 165 for an hour (broken thermometer), and ended up with a very sweet, very cloudy (but full-bodied).

Wouldn't do it again, but it was beer.

Good luck with whatever you try.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:42 PM   #7
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Alpha doesn't just produce non-fermentables. It provides a mix. Beta breaks apart starch from the end. eg takes off a simple sugar and leave the rest of the chain intact. Alpha will break apart the starch at any point - 1 big sugar and 1 simple, 2 big sugars etc.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:42 PM   #8
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At those temperatures you will denature all the enzymes and get no conversion.
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
Alpha doesn't just produce non-fermentables. It provides a mix. Beta breaks apart starch from the end. eg takes off a simple sugar and leave the rest of the chain intact. Alpha will break apart the starch at any point - 1 big sugar and 1 simple, 2 big sugars etc.
Thanks. What would the mix be if only alpha?
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Old 09-18-2012, 01:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nohup View Post
It could be an interesting experiment. I know I one time mashed a big wheat at 160 - 165 for an hour (broken thermometer), and ended up with a very sweet, very cloudy (but full-bodied).

Wouldn't do it again, but it was beer.

Good luck with whatever you try.
Thanks. After reading a bit of the mashing section in Palmer's book, think I need to run this test. Thinking a few oz of crystal and maybe a little 2 row or only crystal.


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