Transplanting? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Hops Growing > Transplanting?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-17-2012, 02:34 PM   #1
JPKDetroit
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Detroit, MI
Posts: 37
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts



I planted 6 crowns this spring and they're doing great. About a month after planting I bought the house across the street and I'm now in the process of fixing and moving. I still own the house where the hops are planted and will be renting it out soon. Should I think about a fall transplant or just wait until Spring 2013?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 06:09 PM   #2
day_trippr
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Stow, MA
Posts: 18,359
Liked 3227 Times on 2410 Posts


As long as they're so conveniently located I'd wait until Spring...

Cheers!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 03:36 AM   #3
B-Hoppy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
B-Hoppy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
ohio
Posts: 1,540
Liked 244 Times on 189 Posts


After they die back and go 'dormant', they'll never know what happens when/where they wake up next Spring. If done next Spring, they'll have to spend some energy developing some new roots once the soil temps. warm up to become established and then take off. Being that they're 'dormant', a Fall transplant will allow the rooting to take place while the soil is still warm enough to initiate root growth and they can spend more energy growing shoots rather than roots next Spring. Maybe this makes sense, maybe not, it's worked for me over the years so I'm sticking to it!

JPKDetroit Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 02:12 PM   #4
JPKDetroit
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Detroit, MI
Posts: 37
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


Thanks!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 02:54 PM   #5
iowabrew
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Ames, Iowa
Posts: 538
Liked 40 Times on 36 Posts


FWIW i had a cascade and willamette in big pots this year. Harvested around end of August, and knew full well they'd be going permanent next year. SO like said above, instead of stressing the plant in spring i decided to transplant days after harvest, this way they can establish a good root system again in the ground over fall/winter. BTW i moved them 25 yards, stuck them in the ground, watered really well and mulched. 2 days later i cut the bines back to only about 4-5ft. So far so good.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 04:04 PM   #6
ArrowheadHops
 
ArrowheadHops's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2012
Posts: 261
Liked 20 Times on 18 Posts


transplant them now and they will be fine next spring

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 02:15 AM   #7
Doongie
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Madison, WI
Posts: 180
Liked 17 Times on 14 Posts


I just bought some cascade plants for real cheap (a dozen for $15), wondering if I should put any in the ground, or keep them in their current containers, or transplant them into pots and keep them indoors till spring. I am wondering if they will stay green under a grow lamp, or if they will go dormant regardless, or if they will just croak all together. Any knowledge about fall transplanting out there?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 04:20 AM   #8
ThreeDogsNE
Good for what ales you
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
, Southwest Iowa
Posts: 648
Liked 36 Times on 28 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Doongie View Post
I just bought some cascade plants for real cheap (a dozen for $15), wondering if I should put any in the ground, or keep them in their current containers, or transplant them into pots and keep them indoors till spring. I am wondering if they will stay green under a grow lamp, or if they will go dormant regardless, or if they will just croak all together. Any knowledge about fall transplanting out there?
I had poor luck with growing some under lights through the winter a few years ago. I might have killed them with too much attention, though. Remember that these plants are still basically weeds at heart. Give them some ground, sunshine, and a little water, and stand back. I would get them in the ground as soon as possible, to give them what time is left to get started taking root in their new home.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 04:31 PM   #9
Doongie
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Madison, WI
Posts: 180
Liked 17 Times on 14 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeDogsNE

I had poor luck with growing some under lights through the winter a few years ago. I might have killed them with too much attention, though. Remember that these plants are still basically weeds at heart. Give them some ground, sunshine, and a little water, and stand back. I would get them in the ground as soon as possible, to give them what time is left to get started taking root in their new home.
That's sorta what I'm thinking. Throw a few in the ground, keep a few in the house. We had a freeze last night, but the weather coming for the next 10 days looks warmer, so maybe they will have enough time to establish a bit.
Did the ones you kept inside die totally, or were they just dormant and you were able to plant them in the spring?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2012, 07:22 PM   #10
B-Hoppy
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
B-Hoppy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
ohio
Posts: 1,540
Liked 244 Times on 189 Posts


It's not so much the air temperature you're concerned with at this point. Even though the frosts and freezes are close by, the warmth that the Earth has absorbed for the last 4 month or so will take at least two months to give up. During these two months (give or take) is when a lot of the 'magic' happens. The crown, being an underground portion of the plant, will naturally continue to form roots during this down-time up to the point when the soil freezes, which is exactly why it's an opportune time to transplant perennial plants like this. Come Spring, the reverse situation is in place in that the soil is now very cold and will take a certain amount of time to warm up to a temperature that root growth will again be initiated (don't know exactly what that temp is but that's how plants generally perform). The main reason most plantings are done in the Spring is that that's the time when Spring pruning of existing yards is done, thus the majority of rhizomes are available at this time. I always thought this way until a situation forced me to have to dig up a crown one Fall. I buried it in a shallow grave for the Winter and when I recovered it the following Spring, I was completely amazed at the amount of unexpected root growth that had occurred over those few months, not really expecting it to have survived in the first place. It's your call.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump