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Old 09-14-2012, 03:39 PM   #1
Aschecte
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Ok I know this is weird but my chinook hops smell like garlic !! Wht is going on here ? The plant was healthy an I harvested on time what is causing this will it go away and are these hops a total loss ? Here is a picture if the plant as well.
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Old 09-14-2012, 04:16 PM   #2
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Seems like I remember reading that some years are different than others causing the plants to produce more or less of some of the compounds that make up the total oils/resins within the hops. I found some wild hops while working in Upstate NY long ago and the beer they were used in had a HEAVY garlic character so it could possibly have something to do with soil composition as well. Ate a lot of spaghetti while that batch was being served. Chalk it up to experience and take good notes from year to year. That's all I got.

 
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Old 09-14-2012, 04:28 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B-Hoppy
Seems like I remember reading that some years are different than others causing the plants to produce more or less of some of the compounds that make up the total oils/resins within the hops. I found some wild hops while working in Upstate NY long ago and the beer they were used in had a HEAVY garlic character so it could possibly have something to do with soil composition as well. Ate a lot of spaghetti while that batch was being served. Chalk it up to experience and take good notes from year to year. That's all I got.
Ironically I live in upstate newyork!! But, the plant was in potted soil in a 15 gallon pot not in native ny soil. I guess they may be a tosser and see if I have better results next year . Very disappointing.
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Old 09-15-2012, 03:20 AM   #4
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Throw them in with some pasta and butter or maybe make a tomato pasta sauce.

 
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Old 09-15-2012, 05:01 AM   #5
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Heard on the BN radio that it is from hops that are too old when harvested from the bine.

 
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Old 09-15-2012, 05:44 AM   #6
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That very well could be the case. If you crush a few cones from time to time leading up to harvest time, you can smell a difference as they hit their peak. At a certain point they start going down hill. It seems like the varieties with a lot of the native American genes in their lineage have some components in their makeup that gives them what's described as 'cattiness'. I don't know if that's what creates problems with Summit but I know it's a real thing though.

 
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Old 09-16-2012, 05:26 PM   #7
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cool. I have used ones that I picked too early. It was pretty good amber ale. So my line of thinking, a little bit early never hurts. Then again I live in the south Texas area. The sun can do some crazy things here. I have first year plants, I already harvested throughout the growing season. They are now growing new bines and making more hop flowers. (I grow them on a fence, so thats a factor too).

I know PH is and soil condition are important. I would love to hear more input from different people about this subject.

 
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Old 09-18-2012, 04:08 AM   #8
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Some high alpha american hops can develop a garlic character when harvested late. Some brewers like it and it can add a rough edge to an IPA that would be too smooth otherwise.

If it is heavy garlic, I wouldn't use it as a single hop but as a 60 minute addition to add a background note it would be fine in an IPA or hoppy pale ale.
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Old 09-18-2012, 04:21 AM   #9
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I wonder if the chemical process that causes ageing hops to smell like zombie foot cheese is related to this? If so, maybe hops that are harvested too late could be aged long enough for the bad aroma to go away but still be useful?

 
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