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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Pitched lager yeast at ~115 degrees, cooled it to 75 within 2.5 hours...
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Old 09-08-2012, 03:25 AM   #1
expatriateNZ
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Default Pitched lager yeast at ~115 degrees, cooled it to 75 within 2.5 hours...

My hot tap is sufficient to scald the skin, I'd estimate 115 degrees. The wort was this temperature when I pitched the yeast. I immediately realized my mistake and was able to cool vessel to 75 within 2.5 hours of pitching.

Browsing these forums it seems that lager yeast can likely survive this temperature, I just might get some off flavors.

I'm just curious how crucial the initial pitching temperature is. If you bring temp into ideal range within a few hours and keep it there, will the super hot start have a significant effect on the brew?


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Old 09-08-2012, 03:44 AM   #2
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Even 75 is ridiculously hot for lager yeast. Brewer's yeast starts dying somewhere north of 120F. Even if yours survived, I'm not sure I'd want to drink a beer fermented like that.


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Old 09-08-2012, 04:53 AM   #3
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I've pitched high. It did not turn out well.
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Old 09-08-2012, 05:55 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatriateNZ
My hot tap is sufficient to scald the skin, I'd estimate 115 degrees. The wort was this temperature when I pitched the yeast. I immediately realized my mistake and was able to cool vessel to 75 within 2.5 hours of pitching.

Browsing these forums it seems that lager yeast can likely survive this temperature, I just might get some off flavors.

I'm just curious how crucial the initial pitching temperature is. If you bring temp into ideal range within a few hours and keep it there, will the super hot start have a significant effect on the brew?
Dry or liquid yeast?
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:39 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helibrewer View Post
Dry or liquid yeast?
It was dry yeast. I'm using the Cooper's DIY kit, with the included "lager" malt. I'm generally confused about this kit- the included instructions call for fermentation range of 70-80 for ~1 week (once SG has stabilized), then 2ndary in bottles for another ~2 weeks or so. But everything I'm reading online about lagers calls for a colder ferment and longer primary. Is there something special about this Cooper's process?
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Old 09-08-2012, 09:47 AM   #6
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Coopers comes with an ale yeast they just like to use the name lager but it is not. If you used straight hot water out of the tap that can scald you it is way hotter then 115. You most likely killed the yeast and will need to get some more.
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Old 09-08-2012, 01:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by expatriateNZ View Post
It was dry yeast. I'm using the Cooper's DIY kit, with the included "lager" malt. I'm generally confused about this kit- the included instructions call for fermentation range of 70-80 for ~1 week (once SG has stabilized), then 2ndary in bottles for another ~2 weeks or so. But everything I'm reading online about lagers calls for a colder ferment and longer primary. Is there something special about this Cooper's process?
Just to second what beerman001 said, Cooper's lager is actually an ale yeast. 75F is still a bit above what I shoot for, but it's not disasterous.

115F water shouldn't feel scalding, though. That's already at the upper limits of what yeast can handle, and my hunch is that you're underestimating. Pitch some new yeast now that you've got the temp down, and quietly contemplate the fact that you just killed billions.
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Old 09-15-2012, 03:23 AM   #8
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I did not re-pitch this one and I think the yeast made it. I got a lot of foam for a few days and it was keeping itself warm. The foam has subsided and it looks cloudy in there. SG is still dropping each day... I'll be curious to see if the hot start ruined the flavor, because that will be (knock on wood) the only thing I screwed up.

PS thanks for all the helpful comments.
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Old 09-15-2012, 04:34 AM   #9
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Brewing tip #1 - take a temp reading before pitching yeast.
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Old 09-15-2012, 01:25 PM   #10
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Pitching warm, and the fermenter "keeping itself warm" would lead one to believe this is going to be quite an experience to drink.


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