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Old 09-05-2012, 11:11 PM   #1
knox_brew
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Default RO/DI Water Filter

I'm wondering about using my ro/di filter for making beer. I used to use it for a saltwater tank but that hobby has went away and now I have a really nice water filter to use.

I know the ro/di filter pretty much strips everything out of the water but I'm not really amazed with the taste o my tap water. Can I add the minerals back in, stick with bottled spring(gets expensive) or just brew up a batch with the tap water to see how it goes?

I know I can buy a valve to skip the di portion of the filter to just use ro which is better for drinking.

Thanks and cheers


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Old 09-05-2012, 11:22 PM   #2
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This might be a question better suited for the experts in the "Brew Science" forum, but I think I can help a little bit.

Many people use RO water to build their own water profiles for brewing. You can pick up brewing salts (e.g. Gypsum, Epsom salt, etc.) and use a water chem spreadsheet to build your own water profile to suit the specific style you're brewing.


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Old 09-05-2012, 11:37 PM   #3
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Do you know the make up of your local water. The guys/gals in the brew science section are a ton of help if you know what your water is made up of.
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Old 09-05-2012, 11:50 PM   #4
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Honestly I'm not super sure about my local water make up but I'm sure I can have it tested for mineral content. It's more of a slight chlorine smell that I'm not too fond of. Nothing too chlorine smelling and not so bad I won't drink it but was just curious what others thought or did with their water.

Feel free to move this to the correct forum I the mods do that around here.

Cheers!
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:07 AM   #5
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I just had mine tested and it doesn't seem too bad. They say it has too much alkalinity for lighter beers(pale ales, pilsners) etc. But for stouts it should work good. If I was you I would get the water tested to see exactly what your working with. I mean sure you can go get an RO system and "build" your water profile to the style but they may not be entirely needed.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:12 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tally350z View Post
I mean sure you can go get an RO system and "build" your water profile to the style
He already has one.

Quote:
but they may not be entirely needed.
Maybe, but the quality of your beer can improve quite a bit if you adjust your water for each batch. It's work, and takes prep time, but the results are more often than not beneficial and noticeable.

It all depends on what you're going for, how much time & effort you're willing to commit to prepping your water, and whether your initial water profile is "close enough" to the style you're brewing.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:23 AM   #7
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Check out the "Water primer" in the Brewing Science forum. It's a sticky, and easy to find.

Basically, starting with RO/DI water is perfect, and doesn't need much adjustment. I finally bought my own RO system this spring after hauling RO water home from the store and mixing it with my tap water for each batch.

It's so much easier now to just fill up at home with my RO water and add a tiny bit of calcium chloride and/or gypsum!

I don't have chlorine or chloramine in my water, but I still have been so much happier with starting with RO water and I would recommend that to anyone.
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Old 09-06-2012, 12:45 AM   #8
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I may just take a sample of my ro/di water to have it tested and have the tap water tested also. I'd be brewing mostly pale ales, ipa and iipa. I do like the idea of starting with a blank slate and adding the minerals to match places and styles.

Off to the chemistry forum.

Thanks!
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:20 AM   #9
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As an owner of a reef tank and a brewer. DI water is not good for drinking as all of the minerals are stripped. I recommend and brew with a good charcoal cartridge or two and the RO side only.
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:26 AM   #10
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You should have your water tested if you have any concerns and if so, most likely it'll be a problem only for certain types of beers you brew (assuming AG). There are many post regarding this (research..); also I found the water info in Palmer's How To Brew book very helpful.


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