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Old 09-04-2012, 04:57 AM   #1
dasher13
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Default New to cider making

Hey guys
So I've bought a 1 gallon organic apple juice Added cinnamon and star anise. 2 cups of sugar to give me a gravity of 1.7 or around 7% Pitched in my bakers yeast and within 2 hours had a vigorous bubbling . Just checked again the gravity after 24 hours and the fermentation has almost stopped and the gravity is 1.000.
This is my first batch of cider but it seems way to quick for the yeast to already be done fermenting ?
Did I do something wrong ?
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Old 09-04-2012, 05:29 AM   #2
overpunch
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24 hours is way to fast in my opinion. Also, 2cups of sugar into apple juice should give you more than %7 alcohol....more like 14%. But baker's yeast isn't a very good choice...it can leave off flavors that are kinda nasty. The one time I tried using a baker's yeast, it tasted great at first but had a horrible after-taste. I ended up tossing nearly the whole gallon. You ought to let yours finish to see if it comes out alright--some people have had decent results using baker's yeast.

But here's my advice: I'd recommend starting a new batch, using 1 cup of sugar per gallon, a wine yeast (or ale yeast), and maybe some yeast nutrient/energizer. If you follow Ed Wort's Apfelwein recipe and read the thread, you're pretty much guaranteed to get good results.
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Old 09-04-2012, 05:48 AM   #3
JtotheA
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You probably just made yourself some rocket fuel judging from how quick that fermented out. Typically the faster it ferments, the longer you will need to age it before it becomes likeable and vice versa. Never tried using bakers yeast but IMOH it's better to start the way you did by "experimenting" and then trying something different like overpunch suggested. If you want to go through the motions, try using a wine yeast that also ferments quick (but is more suitable for brewing) and you definitely have to eventually try an ale yeast (like Nottingham). It's all about learning what you like.
BTW I might have to move to Canada if they sell supplies at the grocery store! One less stop at a store
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Old 09-04-2012, 05:53 AM   #4
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Sorry, that last little tidbit about Canada was intended for "cheapo" from another thread I gotta go to sleep! Everything else still applies though.
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Old 09-04-2012, 04:32 PM   #5
dasher13
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So the fermentation is done. It's smells terrible
Almost like spray paint or that model glue you get as a kid for your planes
So I racked it and gonna see if it's just early fermentation smell or if it's gone off

Anymore thoughts ?
Ps I may have used to much yeast in my cider would that result in what's going on right now ?
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Old 09-06-2012, 03:35 PM   #6
overpunch
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Toss it, and start a new batch using a wine yeast with less sugar.
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Old 09-06-2012, 05:08 PM   #7
Brewski
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Brewed a lot of cider & mead, not to mention a few cysers. Lavin D-47 works the best for me, leaves a little bit of sweet & a more apple flavor, doesn't go as dry as a champagne.
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Old 09-06-2012, 05:23 PM   #8
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Ask Brewski anything about cider...and his answer's always Lalvin D-47. . You should definately consider a brewing yeast rather than bakers yeast...Start with a dry yeast too, liquid yeasts take a starter to really work (even if they claim you can just pitch them in) and they're more expensive. Lalvin D-47 or 1118 are good yeasts. Red Star Champagne is commonly used as well and they are cheap, I think the Red Star is under a buck.
The reason bakers yeast isn't the best choice is because it's cultivated to create the most ammound of CO2 (to make bread fluffy) and not cultivated to create alcohol. It will make alcohol, but not as much and will create kinds of alcohol that add to off flavors.
The last thing to consider with your fast fermentation is the temperature you fermented at; if it's too warm, like upper 70's to mid 80's, that also increases the production of off flavors and undesireable alcohols (unsless your using saison yeast, but that's getting into another discussion). A good fermentation temp for cider with an ale or wine yeast is mid to upper 60's. If it's hot where you live leave the fermenter near the air conditioner where the room temp is coolest, or in your basement where the concrete keeps it cooler.

Aside from that, Overpunch is probably right; you will likely have to toss this batch and chalk it up as a learning experience.
Good Luck
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