"Bohemian Pilsner" with an Ale Yeast - Page 2 - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > "Bohemian Pilsner" with an Ale Yeast

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-06-2012, 08:21 AM   #11
MVKTR2
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
Sandy Hook, MS
Posts: 1,303
Liked 100 Times on 78 Posts


So I'm up in the middle of the night and thought of this thread while listening to grain bill discussion on basic brewing podcast. Thought I'd ad be sure to use a pilsner malt extract. As someone else said without a lot of tweaking you'll be making a blonde, not a pils.
__________________
"Perhaps wisdom for me is understanding how truely small I am, and that there is no smug self centered moment of clarity when there is so much more to learn" Anthony Bourdain

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2013, 09:12 PM   #12
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Conroe, TX
Posts: 713
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts


Only bumping this bc we're considering releasing a "Pilsner" fermented w/ Cali ale.

Quote:
You're making a blonde ale, and at 70F with S-05, it will be a somewhat estery blonde ale.
I prefer fermenting a little cooler (68F), but Cali ale still comes out really clean even at 70F in my experience. If you look at White Labs' forced fermentation data, Cali ale is almost identical to WLP 800 in almost every category:

WLP 001:

Total Diacetyl: 78.12
Total 2,3-Pentanedione: 8.61
Acetaldehyde: 14.005
Ethyl Acetate: 17.46
1-Propanol: 37.23
Isoamyl Alcohol: 90.185

WLP 800:

Total Diacetyl: 70.06
Total 2,3-Pentanedione: 11.44
Acetaldehyde: 13.6
Ethyl Acetate: 18.82
1-Propanol: 34.83
Isoamyl Alcohol: 116.93

Not saying there are no other differences contributing to authentic Pils flavor, but Cali ale is indeed capable of being very very clean. I've been brewing many lager-like beers w/ it for years and even some highly trained palates can't taste the difference.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2013, 09:15 PM   #13
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Conroe, TX
Posts: 713
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts


Another fun Cali ale factoid, especially if leaning towards a more German style Pils w/ more focus on hops, Cali ale is very good at retaining IBUs into the final product.

Not sure if this link will work, but the difference is pretty significant with an over 20 IBU difference between WLP 029 and WLP 001.

http://205.153.117.170/YMReports/upl...One%20Page.pdf

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2013, 04:29 PM   #14
g-star
Recipes 
 
Feb 2010
PA
Posts: 852
Liked 152 Times on 106 Posts


WLP001 is indeed an exceptionally clean ale yeast, but I have never had a beer made with it that tastes remotely close to a true lager, regardless of ferm temp.

We're talking about two entirely different species of yeast, at least a 10F difference in fermentation temp, and a kinetically much slower fermentation process. All of this leads to a different carboxylic acid profile, less total acid production, and as a result less flavor esters. The technical specs you posted don't tell the whole story.

Sounds like you've talked yourself into beliving that WLP001 will produce an acceptable German Pilsner, but IMO it is nothing more than a crude facsimile if not cold-fermented with saccharomyces pastorianus.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2013, 02:58 PM   #15
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2009
Conroe, TX
Posts: 713
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts


Quote:
The technical specs you posted don't tell the whole story.
Totally agree. I was mostly responding to the idea that WLP 001 doesn't ferment exceptionally clean even up to ~70F.

Quote:
Sounds like you've talked yourself into beliving that WLP001 will produce an acceptable German Pilsner, but IMO it is nothing more than a crude facsimile if not cold-fermented with saccharomyces pastorianus.
Again I'm not saying there aren't clearly some differences, but I can guarantee you a well done Pils recipe fermented correctly w/ WLP 001 makes a damn good beer...especially when lagering isn't an option as is the case for many homebrewers.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
yeast cultivating, "growing" multiplying question chainsawbrewing General Techniques 9 07-21-2011 12:16 AM
"faster" and "shorter" mash and sprarge beesy General Techniques 7 02-25-2010 06:24 PM
Giant "starter" - worth washing the yeast? cactusgarrett General Techniques 3 02-05-2009 12:15 AM
ok I still don't understand why u need to "start" your liquid yeast... illnastyimpreza General Techniques 7 10-24-2008 02:39 PM
A Good "Lagering" Temp for my "HefeLagerAle"? Evan! General Techniques 0 10-26-2006 08:25 PM


Forum Jump